Resistant starch may reduce short-term blood sugar levels

April 21, 2017

A study published in Nutrients suggests that a grain-free, potato-based resistant starch type 4 (chemically-modified starches) may reduce short-term blood sugar levels. The clinical study, conducted by KGK Synergize and funded by Ingredion, evaluated the blood glucose and insulin response of 28 healthy subjects after consuming a cookie made with the dietary fiber (Ingredion’s VERSAFIBE 1490) and refined wheat flour (24.1 g total dietary fiber) compared to a control cookie made with maltodextrin and refined wheat flour (0.5 g total dietary fiber). In this randomized, double-blind, controlled trial, participants’ short-term blood glucose and insulin responses were measured for two hours after consuming the cookies. The cookies were matched for total weight, total carbohydrate, sugars, protein, and fat.

The researchers found that intravenous blood glucose was significantly lower at 45 min after the fiber cookie was consumed, compared to the control cookie. Capillary blood glucose concentrations were also significantly lower at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after the fiber cookie was consumed, compared to the control cookie. At 45, 60, 90, and 120 min, intravenous blood insulin concentrations were significantly lower after subjects consumed the fiber cookie compared to the control cookie. In fact, consuming the dietary fiber cookie reduced blood glucose response by 48% and reduced serum insulin values by 46% versus the control cookie.

The researchers concluded that “the results from this study demonstrate how replacing refined flour with RS4 [resistant starch type 4] in a baked good (cookie) reduces post-prandial glucose and insulin response in healthy adults. Further research is warranted in individuals with compromised carbohydrate metabolism.”

Study