Publications on Functional Foods

IFT Expert Report

  • Functional foods: Opportunities and challenges. 2005. Provides a comprehensive review of the importance of functional foods, summarizes the applicable U.S. laws and regulations, and presents scientifically based guidance for demonstrating both the safety and efficacy of functional foods.
  • Functional foods: Their role in disease prevention and health promotion. IFT Scientific Status Summary. 1998. Food Tech 52(11):63-70. Provides a review on plant and animal foods that have been linked to physiological benefits.

 

Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety

2016
  • Bakry A, Abbas S, Ali B, Majeed nH, Abouelwafa MY, Mousa A, Lang L. 2016. Microencapsulation of oils: a comprehensive review of benefits, techniques, and applications. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 15(1):143-182. Describes the benefits and functional properties of various oils, microencapsulation techniques, and application of encapsulated oils in various food, pharmaceutical, and even textile products.
  • Khan MI. 2016. Plant betalains: Safety, antioxidant activity, clinical efficacy, and bioavailability. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 15(2):316-330. Reviews the safety, biological activity and bioavailability of betalains.
  • Muhammad G, Hussain MA, Jantan I, Bukhari SN. 2016. Mimosa pudica L., a high-value medicinal plant as a source of bioactives for pharmaceuticals. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 15(2):303-315. Provides an overview of the functional bioactives as well as pharmacological and phytomedicinal attributes of the Mimosa pudica L. plant and its potential use in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products.

2015

  • Graf BL, Rojas-Silva P, Rojo LE, Delatorre-Herrera J, Baldeón ME, Raskin I. 2015. Innovations in health value and functional food development of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.). Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 14(4):431–445. Reports on challenges and opportunities to optimize quinoa's role in the promotion of human health and nutrition and highlights opportunities for technological innovation and quinoa product improvement.
  • Hamed I, Özogul F, Özogul Y, Regenstein JM. 2015. Marine bioactive compounds and their health benefits: A review. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 14(4):446–465. Discusses the significance of marine creatures as a source of unique bioactive compounds.
  • Multari S, Stewart D, Russell WR. 2015. Potential of fava bean as future protein supply to partially replace meat intake in the human diet. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 14(5):511-522. Reports that fava bean contain non-nutrient compounds that could benefit human health, in addition to protein and fiber, and suggests that it could be used as a functional ingredient to partially replace meat in the human diet.
  • Schaafsma G, Slavin J. 2015. Significance of inulin fructans in the human diet. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 14(1):37-47. Provides an overview of the physicochemical properties and nutritional significance of inulin fructans.

2014

  • Corbo MR, Bevilacqua A, Petruzzi L, Casanova FP, Sinigaglia M. 2014. Functional beverages: the emerging side of functional foods. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 13(6):1192–1206. Reports on the scientific advances in the area of functional beverages with a focus on available products, as well as on the potential health benefits related to their consumption.
  • Jayabalan R, Malbaša RV, Lončar ES, Vitas JS, Sathishkumar M. 2014. A Review on Kombucha tea—microbiology, composition, fermentation, beneficial effects, toxicity, and tea fungus. Com Rev Food Sci Food Safety 13(4):538-550. Provides an overview of the potential beneficial effects of Kombucha tea on cancer, cardiovascular disease, and immune system.
  • Soukoulis C, Fisk ID, Bohn T. 2014. Ice cream as a vehicle for incorporating health-promoting ingredients: conceptualization and overview of quality and storage stability. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 13(4):627–655. Discusses strategies for incorporating innovative functional ingredients in ice cream through the use of techniques such as microencapsulation, nanoemulsions, and oleogels.

2013

  • Anyasi TA, Jideani AI, Mchau GR. 2013. Functional properties and postharvest utilization of commercial and noncommercial banana cultivars. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 12(5):509–522. Identifies the different commercial and noncommercial banana cultivars and their utilization and postharvest utilization, including its use as functional foods, prebiotics, probiotics, nutraceuticals, and processing into value-added products.
  • Pojer E, Mattivi F, Johnson D, Stockley CS. 2013. The case for anthocyanin consumption to promote human health: A review. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 12(5):483-508. Provides an overview of the current science on the pharmacokinetics and potential health-promoting properties of anthocyanin.

2012

  • Daou C, Zhang H. 2012. Oat beta-glucan: its role in health promotion and prevention of diseases. Comp Rev Food Sci Food Safety 11(4):355-365. Provides an overview of the health promoting potentials of oat β-glucan, which may be explained by its physicochemical properties, such as viscosity and molecular weight.
  • Swami SB, Thakor NJ, Haldankar PM, Kalse SB. 2012. Jackfruit and its many functional components as related to human health: A review. Comp Rev Food Scie Food Safety 11(6):565–576. Presents an overview of the functional, medicinal, and physiological properties of jackfruit.

 

Journal of Food Science

2016
  • Ahtesh F, Stojanovska L, Shah N, Mishra VK. 2016. Effect of Flavourzyme® on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides formed in skim milk and whey protein concentrate during fermentation by Lactobacillus helveticus. J Food Sci 81(1):M135-M143.  Reports that the activity of ACE can be increased by fermentation of skim milk by L. helveticus in combination with Flavourzyme®, which could be used in developing functional drink with potential antihypertensive activity.
  • AL-Zuaidy MH, Hamid AA, Ismail A, Mohamed S, Razis AF, Mumtaz MW, Salleh SZ. 2016. Potent antidiabetic activity and metabolite profiling of Melicope Lunu-ankenda leaves. J Food Sci 81(5):C1080–C1090. Reports that Melicope lunu-ankenda extracts has antidiabetic and antioxidant properties and may be used as promising medicinal plant for the development of new functional foods.
  • Balanč B, Kalušević A, Drvenica I, Coelho MT, Djordjević V, Alves VD, Sousa I, Moldão-Martins M, Rakić V, Nedović V, Bugarski B. 2016. Calcium–alginate–inulin microbeads as carriers for aqueous Carqueja extract. J Food Sci 81(1):E65-E75. Reports that the alginate–inulin formulations may be used as a carrier to deliver bioactive compounds from Carqueja in functional food products.
  • Cho Y, Kim N, Khan I, Yu JM, Jung HG, Kim HH, Jang JY, Kim HJ, Kim D, Kwak J, Kang SC, An BJ. 2016. Anti-inflammatory potential of quercetin-3-O-β-D-(“2”-galloyl)-glucopyranoside and quercetin isolated from Diospyros kaki calyx via suppression of MAP signaling molecules in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. J Food Sci 81(1):C2447-C2456. Reports that quercetin and quercetin 3-O-β-(“2”-galloyl)-glucopyranoside (Q32G) isolated from Diospyros kaki have anti-inflammatory potential.
  • Eslava-Zomeño C, Quiles A, Hernando I. 2016. Designing a clean label sponge cake with reduced fat content. J Food Sci 81(10):C2352–C2359. Reports that replacing up to 30% of the fat with natural functional ingredient derived from flax seeds (OptiSol™5300) provides a product with health benefits and a clean label that resembles the full-fat sponge cake.
  • Girgih AT, Nwachukwu ID, Onuh JO, Malomo SA, Aluko RE. 2016. Antihypertensive properties of a pea protein hydrolysate during short- and long-term oral administration to spontaneously hypertensive rats. J Food Sci 81(5):H1281-H1287. Reports that predigested pea protein containing peptides could reduce blood pressure better than undigested protein when administered orally to spontaneously hypertensive rats.
  • Liu Y, Li H, Fan Y, Man S, Liu Z, Gao W, Wang T. 2016. Antioxidant and antitumor activities of the extracts from Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposite Thunb.) flesh and peel and the effective compounds. J Food Sci 81(6):H1553-H1564. Reports that the Chinese yam peel extracts exerted better antitumor activity and had higher reactive oxygen scavenging effects compared to the flesh extracts and that allantoin may play an important role on antioxidative and antitumor capacity in yam peel.
  • Rodrigues AC, Zola FG, Oliveira BD, Sacramento NT, Silva ER, Bertoldi MC, Taylor JG, Pinto UM. 2016. Quorum quenching and microbial control through phenolic extract of Eugenia Uniflora fruits. J Food Sci 81(10):M2538–M2544. Reports that E. uniflora contains phenolic compounds that may have antioxidant, antimicrobial and quorum quenching activity and may be used to develop new functional products.
  • Saxena S, Verma J, Gautam S. 2016. Potential prophylactic properties of apple and characterization of potent bioactive from cv. “Granny Smith” displaying strong antimutagenicity in models including human lymphoblast TK6+/− cell line. J Food Sci 81(2):H508-H518. Reports on the potential prophylactic properties of different apple cultivars, the associated molecular mechanism contributing to antimutagenicity and potential use in nutritional chemoprevention.
  • Song C, Yu Q, Li X, Jin S, Li S, Zhang Y, Jia S, Chen C, Xiang Y, Jiang H. 2016. The hypolipidemic effect of total saponins from kuding tea in high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemic mice and its composition characterized by UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS. J Food Sci 81(5):H1313–H1319. Reports that the saponins from Kuding tea may benefit in managing hypercholesterolemia and may be used for development of functional food and nutraceutical.
  • Su J, Ma C, Liu C, Gai C, Nie R, Wang H. 2016. Hypolipidemic activity of peony seed oil rich in α-linolenic, is mediated through inhibition of lipogenesis and upregulation of fatty acid β-oxidation. J Food Sci 81(4):H1001-H1009. Reports that peony seed oil may have hypolipidemic effect by inhibiting lipogenesis and upregulating fatty acid β-oxidation, in mice fed high cholesterol diet.
  • Šulniūtė V, Jaime I, Rovira J, Venskutonis PR. 2016. Rye and wheat bran extracts isolated with pressurized solvents increase oxidative stability and antioxidant potential of beef meat hamburgers. J Food Sci 18(2):H519–H527. Reports that rye and wheat bran extracts could be used to increase the oxidative stability and health benefits of meat products such as hamburgers.
  • Qin D, Yang X, Gao S, Yao J, McClements DJ. 2016. Influence of hydrocolloids (dietary fibers) on lipid digestion of protein-stabilized emulsions: Comparison of neutral, anionic, and cationic polysaccharides. J Food Sci 81(7):C1636–C1645. Reports that the incorporation of dietary fibers into food emulsions altered the rate and extent of lipid digestion and suggests that dietary fibers could be used for formulating functional foods that control energy intake and thereby improve human nutrition.
  • Vujicic M, Nikolic I, Kontogianni VG, Saksida T, Charisiadis P, Vasic B, Stosic-Grujicic S, Gerothanassis IP, Tzakos AG, Stojanovic I. 2016. Ethyl acetate extract of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. hirtum prevents streptozotocin-induced diabetes in C57BL/6 Mice. J Food Sci 81(7):H1846-H1853. Reports that ethyl acetate extract of oregano leaves, which has anti-inflammatory molecules, protects mice from development of hyperglycemia by reducing proinflammatory macrophage/Th1/Th17 response.
  • Xie F, Wang Y, Wu J, Wang Z. 2016. Functional properties and morphological characters of soluble dietary fibers in different edible parts of Angelica Keiskei. J Food Sci 82(9):C2189–C2198. Discusses the functional properties and morphological characters of soluble dietary fibers from Angelica keiskei as new source of fiber-rich functional ingredients.
  • Zhang E, Sun P, Jin Q, Li X, Zhang Y, Zhang Y, Wu Y, Nan J, Lian L. 2016. Resveratrol regulates activated hepatic stellate cells by modulating NF-κB and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. J Food Sci 81(1):H240-H245. Reports that resveratrol may prevent hepatic fibrosis by targeting activated hepatic stellate cells.
  • Zhu Y, Yao Y, Gao Y, Hu Y, Shi Z, Ren G. 2016. Suppressive effects of barley β-glucans with different molecular weight on 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. J Food Sci 81(3):H786–H793. Reports that barley β-glucans may be used as functional food for the management of obesity.

2015

  • Bakota EL, Winkler-Moser JK, Berhow MA, Eller FJ, Vaughn SF. 2015. Antioxidant activity and sensory evaluation of a Rosmarinic acid-enriched extract of Salvia officinalis. J Food Sci 80(4):C711–C717. Reports that salvia officinalis (garden sage) extract containing polyphenols, including rosmarinic acid was effective in suppressing lipid oxidation and has a potential as functional ingredient.
  • Chen Y, Chang SK. 2015. Macronutrients, phytochemicals, and antioxidant activity of soybean sprout germinated with or without light exposure. J Food Sci 80(6):S1391-S1398. Reports that the yellow soybean sprout provides a higher yield and is more favorable for the industry, but the green soybean sprout provides more bioactive components and might be a better choice of functional food for health reasons.
  • Devries MC, Phillips SM. 2015. Supplemental protein in support of muscle mass and health: Advantage whey. J Food Sci 80(S1):A8-A15. Provides an overview on the role of protein in the diet, with an emphasis on whey protein, in the regulation of muscle mass and body composition in response to resistance training, caloric restriction, and aging.
  • Fu C, Yang D, Peh WY, Lai S, Feng X, Yang H. 2015. Structure and antioxidant activities of anthocyanidins from elephant apple (Dillenia indica Linn.). J Food Sci 801(1):C2191–C2199. Reports that the elephant apple proanthocyanidins could be used as promising functional food ingredients.
  • Jun H, Shin J, Song G, Kim Y. 2015. Isolation and identification of phenolic antioxidants in black rice bran. J Food Sci 80(2):C262-C268. Reports that ferulic acid is a major phenolic compound in black rice bran and black rice bran can be used as a potential source of antioxidant in foods.
  • Kashino Y, Murota K, Matsuda N, Tomotake M, Hamano T, Mukai R, Terao J. 2015. Effect of processed onions on the plasma concentration of quercetin in rats and humans. J Food Sci 80(11):H2597-H2602. Reports on the impact of processing on the bioavailability of quercetin from onion peel powder vs. peel extract and onion bulb powder and extract.
  • Lule VK, Garg S, Pophaly SD, Hitesh, Tomar SK. 2015. Potential health benefits of lunasin: A multifaceted soy-derived bioactive peptide. J Food Sci 80(3):R485-R494. Provides an overview of the antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anticancerous properties of lunasin and its potential role in regulating biosynthesis of cholesterol.
  • Peng M, Bitsko E, Biswas D. 2015. Functional properties of peanut fractions on the growth of probiotics and foodborne bacterial pathogens. J Food Sci 80(3):M635–M641. Reports that peanut white kernel may help in improving human gut flora and reduce the growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7.
  • Perna A, Intaglietta I, Simonetti A, Gambacorta E. 2015. Donkey milk for manufacture of novel functional fermented beverages. J Food Sci 80(6): S1352–S1359. Discusses the possibility of using fermented probiotic donkey milk for development of novel foods to meet the needs of consumers with lactose or cow milk protein intolerance.
  • Rodrigues JB, Paixão JA, Cruz, AG, Bolini HM. 2015. Chocolate milk with chia oil: Ideal sweetness, sweeteners equivalence, and dynamic sensory evaluation using a time-intensity methodology. J Food Sci 80(12):S2944-S2949. Reports on the potential of developing a functional chocolate milk rich in omega-3, associated with sweetener to reduce calories.
  • Selle K, Barrangou R. 2015. CRISPR-based technologies and the future of food science. J Food Sci 80(11):R2367–R2372. Reviews the CRISPR-Cas systems and highlights their potential for the development of enhanced foods.
  • Zeng H, Miao S, Zheng B, Lin S, Jian Y, Chen S, Zhang Y. 2015. Molecular structural characteristics of polysaccharide fractions from Canarium album (Lour.) Raeusch and their antioxidant activities. J Food Sci 80(11):H2585-2596. Reports that the antioxidant activities of polysaccharide fractions are affected by multiple molecular structural factors, such as monosaccharide composition, glycosidic linkage, molecular weight, and chain conformation and suggests that the antioxidant component could be investigated for use as an ingredient in food products.
  • Zhang G, Xu Z, Gao Y, Huang X, Zou Y, Yang T. 2015. Effects of germination on the nutritional properties, phenolic profiles, and antioxidant activities of buckwheat. J Food Sci 80(5):H1111-1119. Reports that germination improves the nutritional value and antioxidant activities of buckwheat.
  • Zi-Ni T, Rosma A, Napisah H, Karim AA, Liong M. 2015. Characteristics of Metroxylon sagu resistant starch type III as prebiotic substance. J Food Sci 80(4):H875-H882. Reports that type III resistant starch from sago supported the growth of both beneficial and pathogenic microbes, however, it had more impact on the growth of Bifidobacteria.  Resistant starch from sago may have prebiotic properties and could be used as a functional food ingredient.

2014

  • Bae HJ, Chung SI, Lee SC, Kang MY. 2014. Influence of aging process on the bioactive components and antioxidant activity of ginseng (Panax ginseng L.) J Food Sci 79(10):H2127-H2131. Reports that aging of ginseng, particularly at 80 °C for 14 days, could increase the bioactive compounds and may be useful in enhancing the biological activity of ginseng.
  • Kothari D, Patel S, Goyal A. 2014. Therapeutic spectrum of nondigestible oligosaccharides: overview of current state and prospect. J Food Sci 79(8):R1419-R1498. Provides an overview on various aspects of production, properties with emphasis on therapeutic applications of functional oligosaccharides.
  • Luhovyy BL, Mollard RC, Yurchenko S, Nunez M, Berengut S, Liu TT, Smith CE, Pelkman CL, Anderson GH. 2014. The effects of whole grain high-amylose maize flour as a source of resistant starch on blood glucose, satiety, and food intake in young men. J Food Sci 79(12):H2550–H2556. Reports that high-amylose maize flour incorporated was associated with better glycemic control in young men.
  • Liu L, Xia B, Jin C, Zhang Y, Zhang Y. 2014. Chemical acylation of water-soluble antioxidant of bamboo leaves (AOB-w) and functional evaluation of oil-soluble AOB (cAOB-o). J Food Sci 79(10):C1886–C1894. Reports that oil-soluble antioxidants from bamboo leaves could be used as a novel and effective oil-soluble antioxidant in functional foods.
  • Walker R, Tseng A, Cavender G, Ross A, Zhao Y. 2014. Physicochemical, nutritional, and sensory qualities of wine grape pomace fortified baked goods. J Food Sci 79(9):S1811-S1822. Reports that baked goods fortified with wine grape pomace may help increase total phenolic content, radical scavenging activity, and dietary fiber in the diet.

2013

  • Cam M, Erdoğan F, Aslan D, Dinc M. 2013. Enrichment of functional properties of ice cream with pomegranate by-products. JFood Sci 78(10):C1543–C1550. Reports that enrichment of ice creams with pomegranate by-products might provide health benefits due to the functional properties of punicalagins in pomegranate peel, and punicic acid in pomegranate seed oil.
  • Jackix E, Monteiro EB, Raposo HF, Vanzela EC, Amaya-Farfán. 2013. Taioba (Xanthosoma sagittifolium) leaves: nutrient composition and physiological effects on healthy rats. J Food Sci 78(12):H1929-H1934. Reports that lyophiized taioba leaf (LTF) has high amounts of dietary fiber, primarily insoluble. Rats receiving LTF leaf had increased fecal mass and fat excretion, and improved bile acid profile, thus suggesting that consumption of taioba leaf may lower the risk of colon cancer.
  • Zeng F, Zhao C, Pang J, Lin Z, Huang Y, Liu B. 2013. Chemical properties of a polysaccharide purified from solid-state fermentation of Auricularia Auricular and its biological activity as a hypolipidemic agent. J Food Sci 78(9):H1470-H1475.  Reports that polysaccharide extracted from Auricularia auricular mycelium grown under solid-state fermentation may lower total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels.

2012

  • Chung Y, Lee JH, Kim DY, Hwang S, Hong Y, Kim S, Lee SJ, Park CH. 2012. Dietary d-Psicose reduced visceral fat mass in high-fat diet-induced obese rats. J Food Sci 77(2):H53-H58. Reports that d-Psicose, a sweetener, helped in reducing weight gain and visceral fat mass in obese rats and could be used as a functional food ingredient.
  • Fu J, Zhang X, Liu K, Li Q, Zhang L, Yang X, Zhang Z, Li C, Luo Y, He Z, Zhu H. 2012. Hypolipidemic activity in Sprague–Dawley rats and constituents of a novel natural vegetable oil from Cornus Wilsoniana fruits. J Food Sci 77(8):H160-H169. Reports that the hypolipidemic activity of Cornus wilsoniana oil may be due to the lipid lowering effects of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including linoleic acid, γ-linolenic acid, and 11,14-eicosadienoic acid.
  • Gao R, Wang Y, Wu Z, Ming J, Zhao G. 2012. Interaction of barley β-glucan and tea polyphenols on glucose metabolism in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. J Food Sci 77(6):H128-H134. Reports that the intake of tea polyphenols and β-glucan has beneficial effects on glucose tolerance, lipid metabolism, and serum antioxidant status in diabetic rats and suggests that cereal foods high in polyphenols may be beneficial for type 2 diabetes.
  • Kong S, Kim D, Oh S, Choi IS, Jeong H, Lee J. 2012. Black rice bran as an ingredient in noodles: chemical and functional evaluation. J Food Sci 77(3):C303–C307. Reports that black rice bran increased the nutritional value and antioxidant properties of noodles.
  • Lin C, Wu P, Liang D, Kwan C, Chen Y. 2012. Quality, antioxidative ability, and cell proliferation-enhancing activity of fermented black soybean broths with various supplemental culture medium. J Food Sci 77(1):C95-C101. Reports that fermented black soybean had antioxidative abilities, reducing power, ferrous ion chelating effect, and cell proliferation-enhancing activity in Detroit 551 cells and it may be used as a functional ingredient in nutritional drinks and health foods.
  • Sreelatha S, Inbavalli R. 2012. Antioxidant, antihyperglycemic, and antihyperlipidemic effects of Coriandrum sativum leaf and stem in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. J Food Sci 77(7):T119-T123.  Reports that coriandrum sativum extracts decreased lipid peroxidation and increased the activity of various antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase in the liver of diabetic rats, and exhibited hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effects, suggesting that the extracts could protect liver function.
  • Sreerama YN, Takahashi Y, Yamaki K. 2012. Phenolic antioxidants in some vigna species of legumes and their distinct inhibitory effects on α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase activities. J Food Sci 77(9):C927-C933. Reports that phenolic extracts from four legumes (mung bean, moth bean, and black and red varieties of adzuki beans) have varying inhibitory effect on enzyme activity associated with hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia and these legumes can be used as health promoting food ingredients.
  • Swaminathan A, Sridhara SR, Sinha S, Nagarajan S, Balaguru UM, Siamwala JH, Rajendran S, Saran U, Chatterjee S. 2012. Nitrites derived from Foneiculum Vulgare (Fennel) seeds promotes vascular functions. J Food Sci 77(12):H273–H279. Reports that fennel-derived nitrites may have beneficial effects on angiogenesis, cell migration, and vasorelaxation.
  • Tanaka M, Yamada M. 2012. Safety Evaluation of supercritical carbon dioxide extract of aloe vera gel. J Food Sci 77(1):T2–T9. Examines safety of Aloe vera gel extract for use as functional ingredients in food products. 
  • Tundis R, Loizzo MR, Bonesi M, Menichini F, Mastellone V, Colica C, Menichini F. 2012. Comparative study on the antioxidant capacity and cholinesterase inhibitory activity of Citrus aurantifolia Swingle, C. aurantium L., and C. bergamia Risso and Poit. peel essential oils. J Food Sci 77(1):H40-H46. Reports on the potential antioxidant and procholinesterase properties of Citrus oils in addition to its use as a flavoring agent in foods or nutraceutical product formulation.
  • Udenigwe CC, Aluko RE. 2012. Food protein-derived bioactive peptides: Production, processing, and potential health benefits. J Food Sci 77(1):R11–R24. Reviews literature on bioactive peptides with emphasis on strategic production and processing methods as well as antihypertensive, anticancer, anticalmodulin, hypocholesterolemic, and multifunctional properties of the food protein-derived peptides and suggests directions for future research.
  • Veronezi CM, Jorge N. 2012. Bioactive compounds in lipid fractions of pumpkin (Cucurbita sp) seeds for use in food. J Food Sci 77(6):C653-C657. Reports that the lipid fractions of pumpkin seeds contain phenolic compounds and γ-tocopherol that may benefit human health and could be used in food products.
  • Yen Wu T, Tsai C, Hwang Y, Chiu T. 2012. Effect of antioxidant activity and functional properties of Chingshey purple sweet potato fermented milk by Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis, and L. gasseri Strains. J Food Sci 77(1):M2–M8. Examines the functional properties of fermented Chingshey purple sweet potato milk using different lactic acid bacteria.

 

Food Technology (members only)

2016
  • Ohr LM. 2016a. The ups and downs of blood pressure. Food Tech 70(12):65-67. Discusses ingredients that may aid in regulating or lowering blood pressure, in addition to lowering intake of sodium.
  • Ohr LM. 2016b. Preserving and protecting joint health. Food Tech 70(11):62-65. Discusses ingredients and supplements, such as glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate that may improve bone health.
  • Ohr LM. 2016c. What’s the buzz on healthful food ingredients? Food Tech 70(9):88-99. Discusses ingredient developments that address consumers’ health and wellness concerns.
  • Ohr LM. 2016d. Gut health news to digest. Food Tech 70(5):59-63. Discusses functional ingredients, such as prebiotics, dietary fiber, and probiotics that may benefit the digestive system.
  • Ohr LM. 2016e. Older but stronger. Food Tech 70(3):59-63. Discusses nutritional ingredients that may play a role in helping individuals ages 50 and older maintain an active lifestyle.
  • Sloan E. 2016. Top 10 functional foods trends. Food Tech 70(4):24-45. Provides trends on functional foods, such as products associated with general heart health, cholesterol, digestion, energy, bone health, immunity, weight, and blood pressure as the most consumed functional foods.
  • Traver T. 2016. NC State researchers exploit plant compounds for human health. Food Tech 70(4):20-23. Provides information on the research on health-promoting plant compounds conducted at the North Carolina State University’s Plants for Human Health Institute.

2015

  • Ohr LM. 2015a. Ingredients for women’s wellness. Food Tech 69(12):64-67. Discusses the role of functional ingredients that may provide benefits related to bone strength, weight management, heart health, cancer, healthy pregnancy, menopause, and skin health in women.
  • Ohr LM. 2015b. Stress relievers. Food Tech 69(10):64-68. Discusses ingredients such as botanical extracts, L-theanine, phospholipids, and prebiotics that may help relieve stress.
  • Ohr LM. 2015c. What’s new in the world of wellness ingredients. Food Tech 69(9):91-103. Discusses available options for food formulators to improve nutritional profiles of foods and beverages.
  • Ohr LM. 2015d. Burning fat, building muscle. Food Tech 69(8):69-73. Discusses nutritional ingredients, such as proteins, conjugated linoleic acid, and green tea catechins, that may help to burn fat and build muscle.
  • Ohr LM. 2015e. Turning down the heat: Anti-inflammatory ingredients. Food Tech 69(7):91-95. Discusses nutritional ingredients that may help combat inflammation, including curcumin, polyphenols, omega-3 fatty acids, and antioxidants.
  • Ohr LM. 2015f. A healthy assortment of functional ingredients. Food Tech 69(6):89-102. Discusses the use of function ingredients, such as protein alternatives and healthy fats in foods and beverages.
  • Ohr LM. 2015g. Solutions for stronger skeletons. Food Tech 69(5):65-68. Discusses ingredients that help build bone, maintain bone strength, aid in calcium absorption, and prevent bone loss.
  • Ohr LM. 2015h. Protecting the aging brain. Food Tech 69(4):109-114. Discusses some ingredients and supplements that may help protect and sharpen aging brains. 
  • Ohr LM. 2015i. The many facets of fiber fortification. Food Tech 69(1):57-62. Discusses fiber ingredients that may help increase intake of dietary fiber and may provide benefits such as improving digestive and heart health, and immunity. 

2014

  • Ohr LM. 2014a. Combating hunger pains. Food Tech 68(10):65-72. Discusses ingredients, such as proteins, whole grains and dietary fiber that may help curb appetite and provide satiation for longer periods of time.
  • Ohr LM. 2014b. Best bets in better-for-you. Food Tech 68(8):81-89. Discusses efforts to address consumer’s health and wellness concerns by providing ingredients that add nutrients, enhance energy, and reduce sugar.
  • Ohr LM. 2014c. Granting immunity. Food Tech 68(4):96-101. Discusses functional ingredients that may help in maintaining a strong immune system during lifespan and through periods of stress, preventing illness, and shortening duration of illnesses.
  • Ohr LM. 2014d. Fueling healthy kids. Food Tech 68(3):67-71. Discusses nutritional ingredients that may benefit bone health, cognition, and immunity in kids.
  • Sloan E. 2014. Top 10 functional foods trends. Food Tech 68(4):22-45. Provides trends on functional foods, such as specialty nutritional ingredients, the emergence of a health-oriented Hispanic market segment, and consumers’ interest in protein consumption.

2013

  • Ohr LM. 2013a. Battling blood pressure. Food Tech 67(10):53-58. Discusses ingredients, such as grape see extract and whole foods that may have beneficial effects on blood pressure, in addition to reducing sodium intake.
  • Ohr LM. 2013b. A wealth of wellness ingredients in the windy city. Food Tech 67(9):84-94. Provides information on the innovation in the area of functional foods and beverages.
  • Ohr LM. 2013c. Awake, alert, and energized. Food Tech 67(7):83-87. Discusses ingredients that may affect energy levels, including ribose, botanicals, vitamins, amino acids, and slow-digesting carbohydrates.
  • Ohr LM. 2013d. Managing muscle and bone mass. Food Tech 67(4):61-66. Discusses the role of protein and vitamin D as well as other nutritional ingredients that may help maintain muscle mass or slow the loss of bone and muscle.
  • Ohr LM. 2013e. Keeping eyesight and memory sharp. Food Tech 67(1):59-63. Discusses memory- and eyesight -boosting ingredients, such as omega-3 fatty acids.

2012

  • Ohr LM. 2012a. Weighing the issues. Food Tech 66(11):57-61. Discusses functional ingredients that may help in promoting satiety, burn fat, and build lean muscle.
  • Ohr LM. 2012b. Strengthening the heart. Food Tech 66(10):75-81. Discusses options such as apples, grapes, and potatoes that may be used to create heart-healthy products.
  • Ohr LM. 2012c. Gender-specific nutrition. Food Tech 66(9):67-71. Discusses gender specific health concerns related to aging and ingredients that can help address these concerns.
  • Ohr LM. 2012d. Health & wellness shine in Vegas. Food Tech 66(8):97-102. Discusses application of ingredients focusing on myriad health concerns, including weight, immunity, heart health, digestion, and bone and joint health.
  • Ohr LM. 2012e. Improving immune and digestive health. Food Tech 66(7):84-94. Discusses the role of functional ingredients, such as prebiotics and probiotics in improving immune and digestive health.
  • Ohr LM. 2012f. Growing healthy kids. Food Tech 66(4):67-72. Discusses ingredients used in foods and beverages that may have the potential to improve children’s wellness.
  • Ohr LM. 2012g. Aging healthfully. Food Tech 66(3):65-70. Discusses health concerns, such as cognition and bone and joint health, related to aging and ingredients that may help address these concerns.
  • Sloan E. 2012. Top 10 functional foods trends. Food Tech 66(4):24-41. Provides trends on functional foods, such as increased attention to disease risk factors, interest in high-protein products, and a demand for real-food solutions as drivers of functional foods trends.

 

Other Publications/Reports

  • American Council on Science and Health Position Paper. 2002. Functional foods: Benefits, concerns, and challenges. J Nutr 132:3772-3781

 

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