Today’s Cookies Are far From Cookie Cutter

Can cookies be good for you? Perhaps if it’s a cookie formulated with innovative ingredients including whole-grain flours, new sweetener alternatives, or healthier fats.

April 23, 2012

CHICAGO — Can cookies be good for you? Perhaps if it’s a cookie formulated with innovative ingredients including whole-grain flours, new sweetener alternatives, or healthier fats. In the April 2012 issue of Food Technology magazine, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), Senior Editor Don Pszczola writes about these new cookie varieties.

Cookie formulators are serving up new options formulated with the addition of fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients. One company makes a sandwich cookie that comes in a variety of flavors, and a three-cookie serving has as much fiber as a bowl of oatmeal, as much calcium and vitamin D as an eight-ounce glass of milk, and as much vitamin C as a cup of blueberries.

Cookies made with almond meal/flour provide protein, vitamin E, and magnesium. This gluten-free ingredient also adds a moist texture and a rich buttery flavor. Probiotic cookies can support the digestive and immune systems. Even people with peanut allergies will soon be able to enjoy the nutty flavor of a peanut butter cookie made with a peanut alternative. These are just some of the ways cookies are being reshaped to fit into a healthier diet.

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About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT's mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere.

For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org .

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