Studies Show Different Types of Vinegar May Benefit Health

The earliest known use of vinegar dates back more than 10,000 years ago and has been used as a food and medicine. A new review article in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), reports on recent studies showing different types of vinegars that may benefit human health.

May 21, 2014

CHICAGO—The earliest known use of vinegar dates back more than 10,000 years ago and has been used as a food and medicine.  A new review article in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), reports on recent studies showing different types of vinegars that may benefit human health.  

Studies referenced in the article show vinegars contain antioxidants, which may reduce accelerated aging, cancer and brain degenerative disorders. Other functional therapeutic properties include beneficial effects on cardiovascular health and blood pressure, antibacterial activity, reduction in the effects of diabetes and increased vigor after exercise. In addition, a few studies showed that people who consumed certain types of vinegar daily may have a decreased appetite.

Authors noted that further studies related to health benefits of vinegar are needed to validate claims.

Read the abstract in Journal of Food Science here

About IFT
This year marks the 75th anniversary of the Institute of Food Technologists. Since its founding in 1939, IFT has been committed to advancing the science of food. Our non-profit scientific society—more than 18,000 members from more than 100 countries—brings together food scientists, technologists and related professionals from academia, government and industry. For more information, please visit ift.org.

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