Certain Nutrients Can Address Men’s Health Concerns

August 24, 2016

CHICAGO – The top causes of death among adult men in the United Sates are heart disease, stroke, cancer and chronic lower respiratory disease, according to the Mayo Clinic and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). In a recent issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists, contributing editor Linda Milo Ohr writes about some of the health concerns men have and the nutrients that may play beneficial roles in addressing them. 

Heart Health

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men in the United States, resulting in approximately one in every four male deaths, according to the CDC. High blood pressure, high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and smoking are key risk factors. Nutritional ingredients, including soluble fiber and plant sterols have FDA-approved health claims linking them to a potential reduces risk of coronary heart disease. In addition, antioxidants and omega-3 fatty acids can help manage issues related to heart health. A study found a daily intake of both insoluble and soluble fiber as a part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol can provide significant cholesterol-lowering benefits (Viuda Martos et. al 2010). 

Prostate Cancer 
Approximately 220,800 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer in the United States every year, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). While no single food or food component can protect against cancer by itself, strong evidence does show that a diet filled with a variety of plant foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and beans helps lower risk for many cancers. Other foods and ingredients like lycopene and walnuts have also been shown to potentially reduce the risk of prostate cancer (Hyunsook et al 2014). 

Body Composition and Exercise Recovery

Body composition and exercise recovery are important for both athletes and sports enthusiasts alike. A meta-analysis of 14 randomized controlled studies showed that the current body of literature supports the use of whey protein as either a supplement combined with resistance exercise or as part of weight loss or weight maintenance diets. Tart cherry juice has been gaining attention as a recovery drink for easing muscle soreness after exercise (Bell 2014). 

Read the full article here. 

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Founded in 1939, the Institute of Food Technologists is committed to advancing the science of food. Our non-profit scientific society—more than 17,000 members from more than 95 countries—brings together food scientists, technologists and related professionals from academia, government and industry. For more information, please visit ift.org.