Meat consumption not linked to breast cancer risk

A study published in the International Journal of Cancer shows that there is no link between eating meat—total meat, red meat, processed meat, or meat cooked at high temperatures—and the risk of breast cancer in older women.

June 29, 2009

A study published in the International Journal of Cancer shows that there is no link between eating meat—total meat, red meat, processed meat, or meat cooked at high temperatures—and the risk of breast cancer in older women. The researchers examined data from 120,755 postmenopausal women who participated in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. The women provided information on what they ate and how often they ate certain foods when they entered the study between 1995 and 1996. They also provided information on meat-cooking methods.

Over the next eight years, 3,818 women developed breast cancer. According to the researchers, breast cancer risk was not associated with intake of total meat, red meat, white meat, processed meat, or meat cooked at high temperatures, or level of doneness of the meat.

Abstract

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