Hong Kong finds H5N1 bird flu virus in chicken carcass

According to Bloomberg, Hong Kong began culling more than 17,000 birds and banned the sale and import of live poultry for 21 days after the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus was found in a chicken carcass at a wholesale market.

December 21, 2011

According to Bloomberg, Hong Kong began culling more than 17,000 birds and banned the sale and import of live poultry for 21 days after the deadly H5N1 bird flu virus was found in a chicken carcass at a wholesale market. The government hasn’t determined whether the infected bird came from local farms or was imported, York Chow, secretary for food and health, said in a statement.

More than 17,000 birds, mostly chickens, have been ordered to be destroyed at the market, according to the statement released on the Hong Kong government website. The market, which also has live pigeons, will be closed until Jan. 12.

The Department of Health is testing workers at the market, farmers, and other people who may have come into contact with the birds, according to a separate statement. So far no human H5N1 infections have been discovered, it said.

Bloomberg article

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