Revised school nutrition standards make the grade

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one-third of children are overweight or obese, which equates to nearly 25 million children.

January 28, 2011

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one-third of children are overweight or obese, which equates to nearly 25 million children. For the first time in 15 years, the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture (USDA) released a proposed rule to revise the school nutrition standards, but will this improve child nutrition and lower obesity rates? In the new ePerspective post, Joy Dubost, Director of Nutrition and Healthy Living, National Restaurant Association, shares her opinion on the new proposed school nutrition standards. Dubost believes that these new standards will work to improve child nutrition and positively impact obesity rates. “With the new nutrition standards, I believe we are not only teaching our kids good eating habits but leading them to a healthier future,” writes Dubost. What are your thoughts on the new standards? Will healthier school lunches truly make a difference in a child’s health? Weigh in with your opinion at IFT’s ePerspective blog.

Joy Dubost’s ePerspective

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