U.S. FDA finds GE salmon safe to eat

According to Reuters, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has stated that AquAdvantage’s genetically engineered salmon doesn’t appear likely to pose a threat to the environment or to humans who eat it.

January 2, 2013

According to Reuters, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has stated that AquAdvantage’s genetically engineered salmon doesn’t appear likely to pose a threat to the environment or to humans who eat it. AquAdvantage salmon eggs would produce fish with the potential to grow to market size in half the time of conventional salmon. If it gets a final go-ahead, it would be the first food from a transgenic animal—one whose genome has been altered—to be approved by the FDA.

The AquAdvantage Atlantic salmon egg was developed by AquaBounty Technology to speed up production to meet global seafood demand. In a draft environmental assessment, the FDA affirmed earlier findings that the biotech salmon was not likely to be harmful. It said it would take comments from the public on its report for 60 days before making a final decision on approval.

“With respect to food safety, the FDA has concluded that food from AquAdvantage salmon is as safe as food from conventional Atlantic salmon, and that there is a reasonable certainty of no harm from consumption,” the FDA assessment states.

Critics say the new salmon is a “dangerous experiment” and have pressured the FDA to reject it. They say the FDA has relied on outdated science and substandard methods for assessing the new fish. There were also concerns the FDA would not require the genetically modified salmon to be labeled as such, and some critics said they may file a lawsuit to prevent what they fear could be the imminent approval of the engineered fish. FDA spokeswoman Morgan Liscinsky said no final decisions have been made on labeling or on the application for approval.

Reuters article

Federal Register notice (pdf)

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