IFT Honors Outstanding Achievements (Online Exclusive) JENNY SCHMIDLI | September 2010, Volume 64, No.9

IFT paid tribute to some of its highest achievers at the 2010 Annual Meeting & Food Expo Awards Celebration. The roster of those celebrated for their noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding contributions to the field of food science and technology included Achievement Award winners and newly elected Fellows. A round-up of the honorees follows.

IFT paid tribute to some of its highest achievers at the 2010 Annual Meeting & Food Expo Awards Celebration. The roster of those celebrated for their noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding contributions to the field of food science and technology included Achievement Award winners and newly elected Fellows. A round-up of the honorees follows.

2010 IFT Achievement Award Winners

R. Paul Singh, Distinguished Professor of Food Engineering, University of California, received the 2010 Nicholas Appert Award, which recognizes an individual for preeminence in and contributions to the field of food science and technology.

Singh’s research record spans a lifetime career in advancing the application of mathematical techniques for quantitative understanding of physical changes important in food processing. Results of Singh’s research have been readily transferred from his laboratory to a wide range of applications in the food industry, including computer software linked to industrial freezers for improving energy efficiency, and improved biosensors for use in monitoring quality in food distribution. He has helped establish and evaluate food engineering programs at universities in South America, Central America, Southeast Asia, Europe, and the U.S. and he has published a food science education textbook in four languages. 

 

Levente Diosady, Professor, University of Toronto, Canada, received the 2010 Babcock-Hart Award for innovative food engineering technologies, which have improved public health through nutrition, especially in developing countries.

Diosady’s interest in applying the principles of chemical engineering and food chemistry to the large-scale processing of food has resulted in improved processes of edible oil refining, vegetable protein extraction, and nitrite-free meat curing systems. For the past 15 years, Diosady has been active in developing techniques to fortify staple foods such as salt, sugar, and rice with micronutrients to combat vitamin and mineral deficiencies in populations where illnesses associated with a lack of these micronutrients are prevalent. He has focused on cost-effective solutions to micronutrient deficiencies, which can be maintained by local governments and manufacturers to combat these health problems. In keeping with his support of healthy populations worldwide, Diosady helped establish the Center for Global Engineering in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Toronto.

 

Cameron Faustman, Professor, University of Connecticut, is the recipient of the 2010 Stephen S. Chang Award for Lipid or Flavor Science for significant contributions to lipid or flavor science.

During his career, Faustman has focused his research on the fundamental basis for interactions between lipid oxidation products and myoglobin in muscle foods, and their practical applications for the meat industry. This research has led to significant interest in the application of dietary supplementation of vitamin E for improving oxidative stability of lipids and for improving color stability of myoglobin in meat, which translates into increased shelf-life and better appearance for meat products. As a result of his research findings, Faustman has been one of the premier science communicators in the area of lipid chemistry, making him a frequent speaker at conferences on food chemistry, meat science, animal science, and biotechnology worldwide.

Featured Links