Consumption of Fruits May Reduce the Risk of Alzheimers Disease

January 30, 2008

CHICAGO – Apples, bananas, and oranges are the most common fruits in both Western and Asian diets, and are important sources of vitamins, minerals, and fiber. A new study in the Journal of Food Science explores the additional health benefits of these fruits and reveals they also protect against neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s Disease.

Researchers at Cornell University investigated the effects of apple, banana, and orange extracts on neuron cells and found that the phenolic phytochemicals of the fruits prevented neurotoxicity on the cells.

Among the three fruits, apples contained the highest content of protective antioxidants, followed by bananas then oranges.

The authors concluded “[their] study demonstrated that antioxidants in the major fresh fruits consumed in the United States and Korea protected neuronal cells from oxidative stress….Additional consumption of fresh fruits such as apple, banana, and orange may be beneficial to improve effects in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s.”

 To view the abstract for this article, see http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2007.00632.x?prevSearch=allfield%3A%28Lee%29

Chang Y. Lee, PhD, is affiliated with the Department of Food Science and Technology at Cornell University and can be reached for comment at CYL1@cornell.edu .

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The Journal of Food Science is published by the Institute of Food Technologists. Founded in 1939, and with world headquarters in Chicago, IFT is a not-for-profit international scientific society with 22,000 members working in food science, technology and related professions in academia, government and industry. As the society for food science and technology, IFT brings sound science to the public discussion of food issues.