Stored Oils Last Longer if a Natural Oxidized Antioxidant is Removed

August 13, 2009

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Chicago – When exposed to oxygen or stored for long periods, some oils lose healthy properties such as fatty acid levels. Researchers suggest decreasing or removing a natural oxidized form of an antioxidant called alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) to reap the full benefits of healthy oils, according to a study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

High concentrations of oxidized alpha-tocopherol cause a breakdown in foods that can cause off-flavors, discoloration and destruction of essential fatty acids. Researchers from Ohio State University studied whether soybean, corn, safflower and olive oil kept their healthful fatty acids during storage. Their findings are as follows:

  • High concentrations of alpha-tocopherol caused a decrease in stability, or loss of health qualities, in all the oils studied.
  • Soybean oil, which contains the highest oxidized alpha-tocopherol content, had the lowest stability during storage.
  • Corn, safflower and olive oils had a decrease in their healthy fatty acids as their oxidized alpha-tocopherol levels increased.

The authors conclude that removing oxidized alpha-tocopherol will help improve the oxidative stability of food during storage.

To receive a copy of the study, please contact Jeannie Houchins at jhouchins@ift.org.

 
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About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) exists to advance the science of food. Our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply contributing to healthier people everywhere. Founded in 1939, IFT is a nonprofit scientific society with 20,000 individual members working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT champions the use of sound science across the food value chain through knowledge sharing, education, and advocacy, encouraging the exchange of information, providing both formal and informal educational opportunities, and furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. For additional information, please visit ift.org.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Jeannie Houchins, MA, RD
312.604.0231
jhouchins@ift.org