Nanotechnology and the Future of Food: Reviews of Application

December 16, 2009

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CHICAGO – The Institute of Food Technologists released three review articles in the Journal of Food Science that were presented at the IFT Annual Meeting in 2009. The articles provide greater detail on nanotechnology science and its application to food.

Nanotechnology is the science of controlling material structures with dimensions of 100 nanometers or smaller. This new science may revolutionize agricultural and food systems and has the potential to impact the science of food in a positive way. For example, it could generate new innovations in food texture, taste, processability, and stability during shelf life. To foster the positive growth of nanotechnology, IFT focused several educational sessions on nanotechnology at the 2009 Annual Meeting in Anaheim.  The following review articles focus on nanotechnology and the future of foods.

Nanocomposites in Food Packaging
- Researchers Arora and Padua from the University of Illinois discuss the challenges of using nanotechnology to create low-cost packaging that assists in functionality, weight, and ease of processing. Nanotechnology could provide better barriers against compounds that impact the shelf life of fresh and processed foods.

Design of Nano-Laminated Coatings to Control Bioavailability of Lipophilic Food Components
- Researcher McClements from the University of Massachusetts reviews the impact of nano-laminated coatings on the bioavailability of encapsulated lipids. Bioactive lipophilic or fat-liking compounds could be incorporated into foods or beverages, which may increase the ingredient’s stability, palatability, desirability, and bioactivity. These coatings could play a role in nutrient release within the human gastrointestinal tract.

Bioavailability and Delivery of Nutraceuticals Using Nanotechnology
- Researchers Huang, Yu, and Ru from Rutgers University examine the applications of nanotechnology in food and nutrition for the design and development of new functional food ingredients. More specifically, the researchers discuss the encapsulation and controlled release of active food ingredients using nanotechnological approaches in great detail. Researchers continue to investigate the improved water solubility, oral bioavailability, and biological efficacies of nano-encapsulated nutraceuticals.

To receive copies of these studies, please contact Jeannie Houchins at jhouchins@ift.org.


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About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) exists to advance the science of food. Our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply contributing to healthier people everywhere. Founded in 1939, IFT is a nonprofit scientific society with 20,000 individual members working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT champions the use of sound science across the food value chain through knowledge sharing, education, and advocacy, encouraging the exchange of information, providing both formal and informal educational opportunities, and furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. For additional information, please visit ift.org.

© 2009 Institute of Food Technologists

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Jeannie Houchins, MA, RD
312.604.0231
jhouchins@ift.org