Children Accepted Whole Grain and Soluble Fiber-Enriched Foods in Test

June 24, 2009

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Chicago – Elementary school children couldn’t tell the difference between refined flour or whole grain and soluble fiber-enriched products, according to an article in the June/July 2009 issue of the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

Researchers at California State Polytechnic University-Pomona studied the consumption of whole grains and soluble fiber-enriched burritos and chocolate chip cookies among elementary school aged children in Pomona, California, and performed a quality evaluation of the products.  During the 13-week test period, children in grades K to 6 consumed products made with refined flour followed by the test products made with whole grains and soluble fiber. No significant differences in consumption were found between the refined flour and whole grain and soluble fiber-enriched foods.

“The study results show potential for both whole grain and soluble fiber-enriched products to be incorporated into the school menus, particularly chocolate chip cookies,” writes lead researcher Maria B. Omary.

One in eight children in the United States has two or more risk factors for heart disease, and childhood obesity and diabetes are on the rise.  The Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 report supports greater consumption of whole grains and dietary fiber to reduce the risk for chronic disease. This creates the need to reformulate foods to make them more nutrient dense, according to the Journal of Food Science article.

To read the research paper, visit: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/122381489/PDFSTART

 
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About IFT
Founded in 1939, the Institute of Food Technologists is a nonprofit scientific society with more than 20,000 individual members working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT serves as a conduit for multidisciplinary science thought leadership, championing the use of sound science through knowledge sharing, education, and advocacy.
For more information on IFT, visit www.ift.org.

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Jeannie Houchins, MA, RD
312.604.0231
jhouchins@ift.org