Yellow Pea Flour May Help with Diabetes

October 20, 2009

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CHICAGO  – Researchers from the University of Manitoba report that whole yellow pea flour can be used as an ingredient to produce low-glycemic foods that may help those with diabetes, according to a new study from the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

With incidences of diabetes increasing, ways to manage glycemic responses, or changes in blood sugar levels after eating, are being investigated. Whole yellow pea flour is readily available and inexpensive, which makes it an attractive functional ingredient. Researchers studied 19 healthy men and women, observing their glucose responses before and after eating food products

  • Researchers created banana bread, biscotti, and pasta using whole yellow pea flour.
  • Each food was prepared using either 100 percent whole yellow pea flour or whole wheat flour as its primary ingredient;
  • Boiled yellow peas and white bread were used as positive and negative controls;
  • Whole yellow pea flour banana bread and biscotti reduced glycemic responses more than whole wheat bread;
  • Whole yellow pea flour biscotti reduced glycemic responses more than whole wheat flour biscotti.

“Whole yellow pea flour can be used as a functional ingredient to produce low-glycemic foods. These findings may be used as a tool for health care practitioners to assist patients in cooking low-glycemic foods that help and prevent and manage type 2 diabetes,” says lead researcher Christopher Marinangeli, MSc RD.

To receive a copy of the study, please contact Jeannie Houchins at jhouchins@ift.org.


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About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) exists to advance the science of food. Our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply contributing to healthier people everywhere. Founded in 1939, IFT is a nonprofit scientific society with 20,000 individual members working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT champions the use of sound science across the food value chain through knowledge sharing, education, and advocacy, encouraging the exchange of information, providing both formal and informal educational opportunities, and furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. For additional information, please visit ift.org.

© 2009 Institute of Food Technologists

FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Jeannie Houchins, MA, RD
312.604.0231
jhouchins@ift.org