Cutting Fat and Calories Can Lower Cancer Risk in Dogs and People

As many as 1 out of 3 cancer deaths in both humans and dogs could be prevented by reducing Omega-6 fatty acids and cutting calories, according to research presented at the 2010 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo®.

July 20, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
RELEASED AT THE 2010 IFT ANNUAL MEETING & FOOD EXPO


FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Mindy Weinstein
IFT Media Relations
312.604.0231
mweinstein@ift.org

As many as 1 out of 3 cancer deaths in both humans and dogs could be prevented by reducing Omega-6 fatty acids and cutting calories, according to research presented at the 2010 Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Annual Meeting & Food Expo®.

Demian Dressler, DVM, a veterinarian specializing in canine cancer, recommends severely limiting snack foods for humans and dogs that contain ingredients rich in Omega-6, such as corn oil, vegetable oil and grain-fed red meat. Too much Omega-6 fatty acid can lead to inflammation, which creates an environment conducive to cancer in dogs and people, he said.
In addition, Dressler said studies show obesity in both dogs and humans limits the production of adiponectin, a hormone that has been shown to inhibit cancer cell growth. He recommended reducing calories, particularly those from sugar, which has the additional danger of not only causing obesity, but also feeding cancer cells and encouraging their growth.

In comparing human and canine cancer, Dressler bases his research on evidence that dogs have similar cancers to humans, and veterinary oncology uses almost all the human cancer drugs to treat dogs. A dog’s compressed lifespan allows researchers to see effects of the drugs quickly and apply those findings to humans.

The panel encouraged pet food manufacturers to consider the health implications of their products to maximize the animal’s health. Kelly S. Swanson, associate professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, suggested the ideal blend of fiber for dog food is about 75 to 80 percent insoluble and 20 to 25 percent soluble. In addition, adding quality prebiotics to pet foods can enhance their gut health, he said, although research still is needed to determine how much is appropriate for an individual breed.

For more information, please contact:

Demian Dressler, DVM, at jj@mauimedia.net
Kelly S. Swanson, associate professor in the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, ksswanso@illinois.edu.

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About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT’s mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere.

For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org.

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