IFT Media Update

March 18, 2011

The following news briefs are from the Institute of Food Technologists® (IFT), a nonprofit scientific society with members working in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government.  This media update includes information on articles from the March issue of Food Technology magazine.  Topics include: new energy drink ingredients; increased number of food science degree graduates; kids’ breakfasts around the world lack adequate nutrients; and food safety tips for handling leftovers.

Information from the following briefs and press releases used for online, print, or broadcast content must be attributed to Food Technology magazine, a publication of the Institute of Food Technologists.  For more information or to interview an IFT spokesperson, call 1-800-IFT-FOOD or Mindy Weinstein, 312-604-0231, mweinstein@ift.org

New Ingredients Provide Spark to Energy Drinks and Foods
Caffeine is not the only ingredient that provides that extra boost. Today, there are a number of ingredients, in addition to caffeine, that are widely used in energy drinks and foods.  An article from the March issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) takes a closer look at some of the current and up-and-coming ingredients being used in energy drinks and foods.

Read the full press release: New Ingredients Provide Spark to Energy Drinks and Foods

Read the full Food Technology article:  http://www.ift.org/food-technology/past-issues/2011/march/columns/nutraceuticals.aspx


Food Science Degree Graduates on the Rise
Increased Interest in All Things “Foodie” and Positive Job Outlook Contribute to Growth
The Food Network, celebrity chefs, diet-related health issues and a heightened awareness of contemporary food movements appears to be translating into more college students choosing to major in food science.  On college campuses across the United States, undergraduate food science programs are showing substantial enrollment increases. An article in the March 2011 issue of Food Technology magazine, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), shows that the total number of students graduating with B.S. degrees from IFT-approved food science programs in the U.S. has almost doubled from 319 in 2004 to 591 in 2010.  

Read the full press release: Food Science Degree Graduates on the Rise

Read the full Food Technology article:  http://www.ift.org/food-technology/past-issues/2011/march/features/food-science-flourishes-on-campus.aspx


Kids’ Breakfasts Around the World Lack Adequate Nutrients
The ‘Food, Medicine and Health’ column in the March 2011 Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists suggests that assessments of kids’ breakfasts worldwide are often high in sugar and saturated fat, low in dietary fiber, and lack essential vitamins and minerals. The global diversity in breakfast composition and the frequency of breakfast consumption appear to present significant public health challenges and personal health consequences. 

Read the full press release:  Kids Breakfasts Around the World Lack Adequate Nutrients

Read the Food Technology magazine article:  http://www.ift.org/food-technology/past-issues/2011/march/columns/food-medicine-and-health.aspx


Food Safety Tips on FoodSafety.gov: Handle Leftovers With Care
Many busy moms and dads rely on leftovers to feed their families throughout the week.  IFT has teamed up with FoodSafety.gov, an online resource for food safety information from the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to educate consumers on food safety involving leftovers.  Jennifer Cleveland McEntire, PhD, Senior Staff Scientist and Director of Science and Technology Projects at the Institute of Food Technologists provides tips on the safe handling and reheating of leftovers that can save you and your loved ones from foodborne illnesses in a  blog post for FoodSafety.gov.  Tips include:

    • Keep your refrigerator at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below. 
    • Store leftovers in shallow containers for quick cooling.
    • Refrigerate food within two hours of preparation.
    • Reheat food thoroughly to ensure that all parts of the food reach 165 °F before eating.

Read the full post at http://www.foodsafety.gov/blog/leftovers.html

For more information on reheating food in a microwave, see IFT video: How to Properly Cook Foods in the Microwave.


About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT’s mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere. 

For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org.

© 2011 Institute of Food Technologists

Contact Us

Jennifer Braner

Media & Public Relations Specialist

Phone: 312.604.0273
Email: jbraner@ift.org