Flaxseed Bagels—Cinnamon Raisin Flavor Preferred

February 16, 2012

CHICAGO—A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists found that cinnamon raisin bagels taste and texture is not as affected by the addition of flaxseed compared to other types of bagels. Flaxseed contains valuable nutrients that may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease by lowering LDL cholesterol levels over time, decrease blood pressure levels and reduce inflammatory markers involved in hardening of the arteries.

Milled flaxseed can be easily incorporated in many different kinds of bakery products such as breads, muffins, cookies and bagels. Because bagels are a popular food item for those seeking healthier food options, they were chosen for this study. But, because flavor is of prime importance in consumer acceptance, the challenge was to create a bagel that appealed to consumers but still had the levels of flaxseed necessary (23 percent) to deem the bagels as truly fortified.

Volunteers in the study were both students and staff, male and female, aged 18 to 65 years old from the University of Manitoba. Volunteers who qualified were both interested in participating and not allergic to any food products. All the participants had previous experience with evaluating baked products.

Although the presence of flax significantly lowered the flavor acceptability of all bagels, the cinnamon raisin flavor of bagel was rated higher compared to plain and sesame bagels perhaps because of greater sweetness intensity. The study concluded that cinnamon raisin appears to be a promising flavoring alternative for flaxseed bagels in the future for clinical trials or as part of the daily diet.

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About IFT
The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) is a nonprofit scientific society. Our individual members are professionals engaged in food science, food technology, and related professions in industry, academia, and government. IFT's mission is to advance the science of food, and our long-range vision is to ensure a safe and abundant food supply, contributing to healthier people everywhere.

For more than 70 years, the IFT has been unlocking the potential of the food science community by creating a dynamic global forum where members from more than 100 countries can share, learn, and grow. We champion the use of sound science across the food value chain through the exchange of knowledge, by providing education, and by furthering the advancement of the profession. IFT has offices in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, D.C. For more information, please visit ift.org.