IFT January 2015 Media Update

January 21, 2015

To:             Reporters, Editors, Producers and Bloggers
From:        IFT Media Relations

The Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) Media Update contains highlights from Food Technology magazine, Journal of Food Science, Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, and FutureFood 2050. Copies of articles are available to journalists upon request. Please attribute content to the Institute of Food Technologists.  

IFT MEDIA CONTACTS:

Stephanie Callahan—Media Relations Manager, 312-604-0273, scallahan@ift.org
Mindy Weinstein—Director of Media Relations, 312-604-0231, mweinstein@ift.org

Follow us on Twitter: @IFTMedia, @IFTFoodieFacts, and @FutureFood2050

TOPICS IN THIS UPDATE:
FutureFood 2050: New Tactics Show Promise for Combating Obesity Epidemic
Food Technology: Food Waste, Arsenic
Journal of Food Science: Salmon Quality
Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety: Pasture-Fed Lamb

Consumer News

New Fat-Fighting Tactics Show Promise for Combatting Global Obesity Epidemic

More than 2.1 billion people worldwide are now overweight or obese and at risk for major chronic diseases such as Type 2 diabetes and heart problems, reported McKinsey & Co. in a November 2014 analysis using data from the World Health Organization (WHO). But new types of evidence-based interventions, such as targeted drug treatments and foods created to be more satiating, may be able to help reverse the upward trajectory of global obesity rates, according to the latest series of interviews from the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) FutureFood 2050 publishing initiative.

View the full press release here

Should Arsenic in Food be a Concern?
The topic of arsenic in the U.S. diet has sparked considerable public interest following publication of an article in Consumer Reports magazine analyzing arsenic findings from fruit juices and rice products. In the January issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) contributing writers IFT Fellow Carl Winter, PhD, Elizabeth Jara, PhD student, and IFT Fellow James Coughlin, PhD, CFS write about how levels of consumer exposure to arsenic are still below levels of toxicological concern.

Read the full press release here
Read the full Food Technology article here

Trade News

Food Waste Challenge Provides Market Opportunities for Innovators
Approximately 133 billion pounds of food produced in the United States went uneaten in 2010 (Buzby, 2014). This adds up to a 31 percent food loss at both the retail and consumer levels and has far-reaching social, economic, and environmental ramifications (NRDC, 2012). In the December issue of Food Technology magazine published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), contributing writers Elise Golan, PhD, director of sustainable development, Office of the Chief Economist, USDA and Jean C. Buzby, PhD, chief of the Diet, Safety and Health Economic Branch in the USDA Economic Research Service write about how food waste in the U.S. represents a market opportunity worth over $160 billion for innovators who can reduce this waste and its impact.  

Read the full press release here
Read the full Food Technology article here
View an infographic on food waste here

Ultra-High Pressure Processing May Increase Salmon Shelf-Life
Salmon is a popular food source worldwide. It is often vacuum-packaged, smoked, frozen, or canned to increase the shelf life. However, the quality of the salmon flesh (meat) may decrease during these processes.  A new study in the Journal of Food Science published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) assessed the quality of salmon flesh after exposure to ultra-high level pressure (UHP) at different levels (200,400, or 600 MPa) and 30 days of storage at 4 degrees Celsius.  The researchers found that salmon flesh treated with UHP at levels greater than or equal to 400 MPa improved the color, hardness, and chewiness of the flesh, and inhibited microorganism proliferation, thus increasing shelf life.


Read the Journal of Food Science abstract here

Pasture Feeding May Improve Nutritional Benefits of Red Meat
Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of early mortality in the Western world and has largely been attributed to diets rich in saturated fat. Health risks can be reduced by substituting a portion of dietary saturated fats for polyunsaturated fats. A new review article in Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) found that pasture-fed lamb meat is high in polyunsaturated fat due to the specific plant species consumed.

Read the Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety article here

Contact Us

Emily Behn

Media Relations Specialist

Phone 312-604-0273
Fax 312.596.5673
Email: ebehn@ift.org