Hibiscus Leaf May Help Treat Melanoma

March 12, 2015

CHICAGO— Previous studies have demonstrated that polyphenolic compounds in edible plants have various pharmacological benefits, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-atherogenic effects. A new study in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), found that Hibiscus sabdariffa leaf polyphenolic extract (HLP) may induce human melanoma cell death and may serve as a chemotherapeutic agent to eliminate cancer cells without significant harmful effects to normal cells.

Hibiscus leaf is consumed as a vegetable served in sauces or soups in Africa. The findings of this study support the idea that cancer patients may benefit from consuming HLP as a complementary medicine to their treatments.

Melanoma is highly curable if caught early, but is much more likely than other forms of skin cancer to spread if left untreated.

Read the Journal of Food Science abstract here

About IFT
Founded in 1939, the Institute of Food Technologists is committed to advancing the science of food. Our non-profit scientific society—more than 17,000 members from more than 95 countries—brings together food scientists, technologists and related professionals from academia, government, and industry. For more information, please visit ift.org.

Contact Us

Jennifer Braner

IFT PR and Media Specialist

Phone: 312.604.0273
Email: jbraner@ift.org