The gut microbiome plays an important role in digestion, immune health, metabolism, weight, sleep, and much more. Therefore, maintaining a healthy gut is critically important, and diversity of the microbiome is key.

Prebiotics are non-digestible food components that promote the growth of beneficial microorganisms in the intestine. In doing so, they support the body in building a healthier and more balanced environment within the gut, which can lead to several positive health outcomes, including:

  • Stimulating the immune system
  • Inhibiting pathogens
  • Improving bowel function
  • Increasing calcium absorption
  • Reducing blood lipids levels

Prebiotics naturally occur in a variety of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, including:

  • Apples
  • Banana
  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Beans
  • Chicory root
  • Dandelion greens
  • Garlic
  • Leeks
  • Onions
  • Barley
  • Flaxseed
  • Oats

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