banner
natto

While investigating the link between consumption of soy products and all-cause mortality, researchers in Japan found that a higher intake of fermented soy products, such as natto and miso, was associated with a lower risk of mortality. The results of the study were published in The BMJ.

The researchers’ findings were based on the results of an observational study of more than 42,000 men and 50,000 women in 11 of Japan’s public health centers. After responding to questionnaires about diet, lifestyle, and health status during a nearly 15-year follow-up period, it was found that participants with higher intakes of fermented soy products had a 10% lower risk of all-cause mortality. In contrast, total soy product consumption was not linked with all-cause mortality.

Lower risk of cardiovascular-related death was also experienced by both men and women who ate natto. The results remained the same, even after adjustments were made for vegetable intake, which was higher for participants whose natto intake was greater. One explanation for the positive associations seen in fermented soy products is their higher levels of fiber, potassium, and bioactive components as compared with non-fermented soy products.

Although the study results are compelling, the researchers conclude that because of the study’s observational nature, “findings should be interpreted with caution because the significant association of fermented soy products could be attenuated by unadjusted residual confounding.”

Further exploration is needed, added the researchers, to better establish the association between fermented soy intake and health outcomes, and to help inform the development of healthier and more palatable products.

More from IFTNEXT right arrow

Enzyme technology enables efficient PET recycling

France-based Carbios is developing the first biological technology to transform the end-of-life of plastics, says Martin Stephan, deputy CEO of Carbios.

A new approach to reducing salt while maintaining taste

The dangers of a high-sodium diet have been well documented, but a new technology devised by scientists from Washington State University could help reduce sodium in processed foods while retaining taste and texture.

Sucralose–carbohydrate combo may affect insulin sensitivity

A study found that people who drank beverages that contained the low-calorie sweetener sucralose did experience metabolic problems and issues with neural responses but only when the beverage was formulated with both sucralose and a tasteless sugar (maltodextrin).

More from IFT right arrow

Startups Build Sustainable Food Systems

A look at two of the MIT Solve Challenge winners and how they are working to build more sustainable food systems.

How Protein Bolsters COVID-19 Recovery

Adequate protein intake during both the acute and post-acute phases of COVID is linked to decreased morbidity and mortality.

Tiny Organisms, Huge Potential

Microbial fermentation is establishing itself as a true third pillar of the alternative protein industry, on par with—and enabling—parallel advances in plant-based proteins and cultivated meat.

Flexitarianism on the Rise; Transparency Tops 2021 Trends

News about food science research, food companies, food regulations, and consumer/marketplace trends

The Changing Face of Food Science

IFT President Noel Anderson calls for innovative new approaches to address public health issues and help feed the planet.

Latest News right arrow

National Honey Board seeks honey–food pairings to encourage consumption of Mediterranean diet

The National Honey Board (NHB) is currently accepting pre-proposals for honey food-pairings to help Americans consume a Mediterranean diet pattern. Interested researchers need to submit a short pre-proposal by November 13, 2020.

COVID-19’s impact on lifestyles and eating behaviors in Asia

According to Innova Market Insights’ COVID-19 Consumer Survey (conducted in March 2020), in China, India, and Indonesia, personal concerns center on health, personal income, and the availability of healthcare and products to buy.

A low-carb diet may lower the risk of blinding eye disease

Following a long-term diet that’s low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein from vegetables may reduce the risk of the most common subtype of glaucoma, according to a study published in Eye-Nature.

FDA announces qualified health claim for cranberry products and urinary tract infections

The U.S. FDA has announced in a letter of enforcement discretion that it does not intend to object to the use of certain qualified health claims regarding consuming certain cranberry products and a reduced risk of recurrent urinary tract infection in healthy women.

Lee Kum Kee awarded LEED Platinum certification for Xinhui production base

Lee Kum Kee, an Asian sauce provider, has announced that its Xinhui Production Base was awarded LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum certification.