banner
Camembert cheese

New research presents interesting findings on how wild strains of molds evolved into the ones used in cheese production today. The insights may help scientists better understand the evolution of other microbes used to produce fermented foods.

The various fungi that grow on foods contribute to the flavors that develop when the foods are fermented. For example, the domesticated strain, Penicillium camemberti, is a mold used to produce Camembert cheese. The research team at Tufts University, which studies the microbial diversity in fermented foods, found that some wild strains of Penicillium molds evolved in a matter of a few weeks to resemble what they called their “domesticated cousin,” Penicillium camemberti.

The researchers report that their findings suggest that wild strains of Penicillium could be deliberately domesticated to produce a new range of flavors in cheese and other fermented foods. The study is published in mBio and is described in a press release provided by the American Society for Microbiology.

More from IFTNEXT right arrow

Episode 29: All About Food Safety Culture

In this podcast, we discuss food safety culture, including how food safety culture is established, measured, and how they are expected to change in light of ongoing advancements in food science and policy. Our guests include Hugo Gutierrez, Global Food Safety and Quality Officer for Kerry, and Bob Gravani, Professor Emeritus of Food Science and Director Emeritus of the National Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) Program at Cornell University.

Solving the mystery of wooden breast syndrome

Wooden breast syndrome is a muscle-quality disorder that affects only broiler chickens, rendering their pectoral muscles (i.e., breast meat) tough and chewy. Scientists have made progress in finding the cause of the disorder and a way to manage it.

New appliance refrigerates, stores, and cooks meals

Before the emergence of COVID-19 and stay-at-home orders, one of the biggest complaints of busy individuals was not having time to prepare and cook balanced meals. A new appliance shows promise in solving that problem—for those who can afford it.

Identifying chocolate using its ‘fingerprints’

Researchers from Towson University developed a method for determining where a particular chocolate was produced using its chemical “fingerprint,” with the hopes that it could one day be used to trace the chocolate back to the farm that grew the beans.

Latest News right arrow

Nespresso to expand its production center in Switzerland

Nespresso has announced a CHF 160 million (approximately $170.5 million) investment to expand its Romont production center in Switzerland to meet increasing consumer demand for its premium coffees and support international development in the coming years.

Motif FoodWorks collaborates to improve the sensory experience of plant-based foods

Motif FoodWorks has announced partnerships the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) to better understand and design the rheological properties of plant-based foods.

Consumer perceptions of novel food technologies

In a review article published in Nature Food, researchers from the Institute for Environmental Decisions (IED) in Switzerland examine how heuristics and individual differences among consumers influence the acceptance of agri-food technologies.

Olam launches research award for innovations in food security

Olam International, in partnership with Agropolis Fondation, has launched the fourth biennial Olam Prize for Innovation in Food Security, an award seeking ground-breaking scientific research that can deliver transformational impacts within global agriculture.

Scientists decode how the brain senses smell

Scientists have further decoded how mammalian brains perceive odors and distinguish one smell from thousands of others.