IFTNEXT Newsletter

IFTNext Newsletter

Inspiring Innovation to Feed the Future and Beyond 

Researched and written weekly by the editorial team of Food Technology magazine, the IFTNEXT Newsletter explores what are, arguably, the next big things in the science of food through original reporting of scientific breakthroughs, leading-edge technology, novel food components, and transdisciplinary R&D.

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For the of week October 21, 2019

hard cheese

Can cheese prevent blood vessel damage?

A small study from researchers at Pennsylvania State University and two other universities suggests that the antioxidants in cheese may offset the damage caused to blood vessels by sodium consumption.
October 18, 2019
hard cheese

Can cheese prevent blood vessel damage?

A small study from researchers at Pennsylvania State University and two other universities suggests that the antioxidants in cheese may offset the damage caused to blood vessels by sodium consumption.
October 18, 2019
Listeria

Newly discovered Listeria strain may present new food safety threat

International researchers led by the Institute of Medical Microbiology at the Justus Liebig University Giessen (JLU) in Germany have discovered a highly virulent strain of Listeria monocytogenes that may present a new food safety threat.
October 18, 2019
milk powder

Novel process yields a more functional milk protein powder

A novel method of processing yields skim milk powders with improved functionality and properties, and may one day lead to “cleaner” labels on foods, according to researchers at Penn State University.
October 17, 2019
StartLife Accelerate

StartLife selects eight food, agtech startups for accelerator program

Eight food and agtech startups have been selected to participate in the fall 2019 edition of StartLife Accelerate—a 12-week startup accelerator program in the Netherlands that offers pre-seed funding, business support, and access to corporations and investors.
October 18, 2019
Low FODMAP diet

Low FODMAP diet may reduce symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease

Researchers from the UK and France have found that a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAP) improved some gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
October 17, 2019
StartLife Accelerate

StartLife selects eight food, agtech startups for accelerator program

Eight food and agtech startups have been selected to participate in the fall 2019 edition of StartLife Accelerate—a 12-week startup accelerator program in the Netherlands that offers pre-seed funding, business support, and access to corporations and investors.
October 18, 2019
Low FODMAP diet

Low FODMAP diet may reduce symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease

Researchers from the UK and France have found that a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAP) improved some gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
October 17, 2019
Listeria

Newly discovered Listeria strain may present new food safety threat

International researchers led by the Institute of Medical Microbiology at the Justus Liebig University Giessen (JLU) in Germany have discovered a highly virulent strain of Listeria monocytogenes that may present a new food safety threat.
October 18, 2019
milk powder

Novel process yields a more functional milk protein powder

A novel method of processing yields skim milk powders with improved functionality and properties, and may one day lead to “cleaner” labels on foods, according to researchers at Penn State University.
October 17, 2019

More from IFTNEXT

Could a high-fat diet during pregnancy prevent Alzheimer’s?

Animals born to mothers fed a high-fat diet during gestation were protected against brain changes characteristic of late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study published by researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University.

Human gut microbes may mitigate the effects of processed food

Formed during the food manufacturing process, Maillard reaction products (MRPs) in processed food can have harmful health effects. A study published in Cell Host & Microbe shows that human gut microbes can break down fructoselysine, a common MRP, into innocuous byproducts.

Soybean compound may protect blood vessels of marijuana consumers

Research indicates that smoking marijuana may increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. A recent study has determined that a compound in soybeans may mitigate that risk.

UC Davis develops five new strawberry varieties

Five new strawberry varieties boasting properties that will help growers control costs, better manage diseases, and use less water, fertilizer, and pesticides have been developed through the Public Strawberry Breeding Program at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis).

Prawn aquaculture can help reduce parasitic disease

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, recently revealed new research that outlines how freshwater prawn farms can reduce the spread of the parasitic disease schistosomiasis.

UN awards food, agriculture projects for global climate action

The United Nations has announced its Global Climate Action Awards for 2019. The award-winning projects range from an initiative to train sub-Saharan African women sustainable agriculture practices to a “climate positive” burger.