IFTNEXT Newsletter

IFTNext Newsletter

Inspiring Innovation to Feed the Future and Beyond 

Researched and written weekly by the editorial team of Food Technology magazine, the IFTNEXT Newsletter explores what are, arguably, the next big things in the science of food through original reporting of scientific breakthroughs, leading-edge technology, novel food components, and transdisciplinary R&D.

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For the of week December 9, 2019

chocolates

Chocolate-based ‘ink’ allows 3-D printing at room temperature

A novel approach to 3-D printing has allowed researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) to 3-D print chocolate-based products at room temperature using cold extrusion.
December 10, 2019
chocolates

Chocolate-based ‘ink’ allows 3-D printing at room temperature

A novel approach to 3-D printing has allowed researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) to 3-D print chocolate-based products at room temperature using cold extrusion.
December 10, 2019
sugar cubes

Enzymatic bioprocess may produce tagatose economically

While tagatose has many advantages for use as a sweetener in formulated food and drink products, its cost of production has hindered its application. But that may change thanks to research from Tufts University.
December 9, 2019
sour taste

Insights into sensing sour taste

Sour is one of the five basic tastes that humans can detect, and researchers from the University of Southern California have identified a sour taste receptor that sheds light on how sour taste is sensed.
December 5, 2019
© Georgina Smith / CIAT / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Genomic analysis results in more rapid breeding of disease-resistant beans

New developments in plant breeding techniques show promise in being able to breed disease-resistant bean varieties quickly and selectively than what is currently available.
December 6, 2019
wheat stalks

Making the best wheat varieties even better

Identifying wheat varieties that are champions at photosynthesis—the process by which plants convert sunlight, water, and CO2 into organic matter—could help grain growers get more yield for fewer inputs in the farm.
December 4, 2019
© Georgina Smith / CIAT / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Genomic analysis results in more rapid breeding of disease-resistant beans

New developments in plant breeding techniques show promise in being able to breed disease-resistant bean varieties quickly and selectively than what is currently available.
December 6, 2019
wheat stalks

Making the best wheat varieties even better

Identifying wheat varieties that are champions at photosynthesis—the process by which plants convert sunlight, water, and CO2 into organic matter—could help grain growers get more yield for fewer inputs in the farm.
December 4, 2019
sugar cubes

Enzymatic bioprocess may produce tagatose economically

While tagatose has many advantages for use as a sweetener in formulated food and drink products, its cost of production has hindered its application. But that may change thanks to research from Tufts University.
December 9, 2019
sour taste

Insights into sensing sour taste

Sour is one of the five basic tastes that humans can detect, and researchers from the University of Southern California have identified a sour taste receptor that sheds light on how sour taste is sensed.
December 5, 2019

More from IFTNEXT

Broccoli compound may promote kidney health for some

Research with a mouse model coupled with an analysis of human clinical trial data have suggested that bioactive compound(s) in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables may reduce the progression of kidney disease in mice and humans with a specific genetic makeup.

Growing crops in high-salinity soil

Earth’s soil is becoming more saline, and as it does, growing crops becomes more difficult or impossible. Scientists at Brigham Young University (BYU) may have discovered a way to prevent soil salinity from ruining crops and crop yields.

Students engineer honey using bacterium, not bees

A team of 12 students from the Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology has won a gold medal at the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) competition in Boston for its bee-free honey.

Identifying the genes that control plant traits

An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach to identifying the genes that control plant traits.

Learning about human appetites from the common fruit fly

Insights into the diets of the tiny common fruit fly may help provide understandings into how humans evolved to eat what we eat, according to new research published in Cell Reports and a press release from Kyoto University.

Technology extends the shelf life of apples

Researchers from the Institute of Environmental Biotechnology at TU Graz in cooperation with the Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology and industrial partners have successfully tested ecological methods (i.e., hot water treatment [HWT] and biocontrol organisms) that improve the storage of apples and extend their shelf life.