Introduction: Food Foundations Part 1 – Rooted in Food Science: Feeding Tomorrow

‘Food Foundations’ is a play on words that highlights foundations that work on improving global food and agriculture. The focus is on how food science could improve lives by increasing food supplies, extending shelf life, improving packaging and storage, reducing postharvest loss and consumer waste, integrating nutrition and agriculture, training and education, food safety, sustainable food systems, etc. Other aspects may also be covered, depending on the foundation’s specific work. This episode features Feeding Tomorrow, the foundation of IFT.

 

Guests:

Bernhard van Lengerich, PhD, 2018 - 2019 Chair of Feeding Tomorrow, completed his PhD in Food/Biotechnology at the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. His work experience includes Unilever Germany, RJR Nabisco, New Jersey and the Buehler Group in Switzerland as VP Global R&D Food


Nancy Moriarity, PhD, 2019 - 2020 Chair of Feeding Tomorrow, earned her B.S., Biology, from the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She also earned her Ph.D. in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Illinois, specializing in lipid chemistry and biochemistry. Before her retirement in 2016, she supported Global R&D strategy, providing strategic leadership to the arm of PepsiCo’s R&D function providing shared services to global category R&D teams. Prior to this, Nancy was a part of Frito-Lay and completed post-doctoral work at USDA.



Co-Host:

Donna Rosa, 2018 - 2019 Feeding Tomorrow Liaison of the IFT International Division, is an international business development services (BDS) consultant specializing in food processing and agribusiness. She works with micro- and small enterprises in developing countries, offering advisory services such as business analysis, business plan development, market research, training, organization development, and counseling. She has a special interest in food security and utilizing food science to address it.

Host:

Matt

Matt Teegarden, Ph.D., recently completed his Ph.D. in Food Science at The Ohio State University where he also completed his B.S. and M.S. He now works as a Scientist in Product Research and Development at Abbott Nutrition. Matt’s scientific focus is in food chemistry and functional foods. He is also an active science communicator, as a co-founder of Don’t Eat the Pseudoscience and host of the IFTNext Food Disruptors podcast




Are you a start-up looking for an opportunity to share your innovative product with a large concentration of motivated buyers and venture capitalists?

Then you need to learn more about IFT's IFTNEXT Food Disruption Challenge™ Competition!

Participate in this exciting competition designed to help emerging and investment-ready companies gain visibility and make strategic connections. Finalists will be selected to participate in a high-profile pitching event, featured at IFT19 in New Orleans on June 4, 2019. $25,000 grand prize and $5,000 people’s choice award. Special application incentives available.

Applications accepted November 27, 2018 – January 10, 2019.

Learn more

In This Article

  1. Innovation & Insights

More from IFTNEXT right arrow

Can cheese prevent blood vessel damage?

A small study from researchers at Pennsylvania State University and two other universities suggests that the antioxidants in cheese may offset the damage caused to blood vessels by sodium consumption.

Newly discovered Listeria strain may present new food safety threat

International researchers led by the Institute of Medical Microbiology at the Justus Liebig University Giessen (JLU) in Germany have discovered a highly virulent strain of Listeria monocytogenes that may present a new food safety threat.

Novel process yields a more functional milk protein powder

A novel method of processing yields skim milk powders with improved functionality and properties, and may one day lead to “cleaner” labels on foods, according to researchers at Penn State University.

Low FODMAP diet may reduce symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease

Researchers from the UK and France have found that a diet low in fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAP) improved some gut symptoms and improved health-related quality of life for sufferers of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

More from IFT

Will Jellyfish Be On the Menu in 2050?

More plant-based foods in the next decade, cultured meat and underutilized seafood species at mid-century, and customized nutrient patches and pills 150 years from now, according to a “Future of Food Report” from British supermarket chain Sainsbury’s as part of its 150th anniversary celebration.

Innovation Award Winners Embrace Back to Nature

As consumers seek more ‘natural’ products with fewer additives and ‘simpler’ ingredients, more knowledge of what’s in their food, and how their food is made, this clean label movement is spurring innovations in product development in the food industry.

Mining Big Data to Improve Food Safety

It’s not uncommon for people to use the internet to research their health concerns by entering their symptoms in a search engine like Google. Now, that data may help identify potentially unsafe restaurants faster and with more accuracy than traditional methods.

Foods for Better Thought

As people age, some degree of cognitive decline is inevitable, but minimizing the extent of age-related cognitive decline is possible.

Natural Antioxidants From Bran

A study details the discovery by researchers of an antioxidant found in grain bran that could preserve food longer and replace synthetic alternatives.

Latest News right arrow

Most Gen Xers believe link between diet and cancer

With Gen Xers (aged 40–55) now in middle age, the International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation, in partnership with the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR), released a new survey that examines their food and health attitudes, with a particular focus on their behaviors and perceptions related to diet and cancer risk.

Obesity-related diseases expected to decrease life expectancy by three years

A new report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)—an intergovernmental economic organization with 36 member countries—shows that an increasing number of people are overweight and that this is curbing gross domestic product (GDP) by an estimated 3.3% on average.

Leading with flavor encourages vegetable consumption

How dining halls describe vegetables could make a big difference in whether people actually eat them, Stanford researchers report in a new study published in Psychological Science.

Milk startups compete for $250,000 in Real California Milk Accelerator competition

Milk-based beverages for active kids and ready-to-drink lattes with collagen are among the nine finalists announced in the California Milk Advisory Board’s (CMAB) Real California Milk Accelerator dairy startup competition designed to inspire ideas integrating the values of fluid milk into contemporary products and provide resources to help bring them to market.

Drinking more sugary beverages of any type may increase type 2 diabetes risk

People who increase their consumption of sugary beverages—whether they contain added or naturally occurring sugar—may face moderately higher risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a new study published in Diabetes Care.