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Introduction:  Food Foundations Part 3 - Rooted in Sustainable Food Systems: The Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition Foundation

‘Food Foundations’ is a play on words that highlights foundations that work on improving global food and agriculture. The focus is on how food science could improve lives by increasing food supplies, extending shelf life, improving packaging and storage, reducing post-harvest loss and consumer waste, integrating nutrition and agriculture, training and education, food safety, sustainable food systems, etc. Other aspects may also be covered, depending on the foundation’s specific work. This episode features the Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition Foundation.
  


Panelist:

Marta Antonelli, PhD leads the Research Programme of the BCFN Foundation since 2017. She brings 10+ years of experience as researcher, lecturer, consultant and journalist in the fields of sustainable food production and consumption, agricultural policy, water governance and environmental footprints. Her experience includes positions, among others, University of Roma Tre, University IUAV of Venice and the Swiss Federal Institute for Aquatic Science and Technology. Currently she is a Research Fellow of the Euro-Mediterranean Centre on Climate Change. She holds MSc in International Economics (La Sapienza University of Rome), Development Studies (SOAS, University of London) and a PhD in Geography (King's College London).


Co-Host:

Donna Rosa is an international business development services (BDS) consultant specializing in food processing and agribusiness. She works with micro- and small enterprises in developing countries, offering advisory services such as business analysis, business plan development, market research, training, organization development, and counseling. She has a special interest in food security and utilizing food science to address it. She has held leadership positions in local IFT chapters and is currently the Feeding Tomorrow Liaison for the International Division.



Host:

Matt

Matt Teegarden, Ph.D., recently completed his Ph.D. in Food Science at The Ohio State University where he also completed his B.S. and M.S. He now works as a Scientist in Product Research and Development at Abbott Nutrition. Matt’s scientific focus is in food chemistry and functional foods. He is also an active science communicator, as a co-founder of Don’t Eat the Pseudoscience and host of the IFTNext Food Disruptors podcast




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