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"Food Foundations" is a play on words that highlights foundations that work on improving global food and agriculture. The focus is on how food science could improve lives by increasing food supplies, extending shelf life, improving packaging and storage, reducing post-harvest loss and consumer waste, integrating nutrition and agriculture, training and education, food safety, sustainable food systems, etc. Other aspects may also be covered, depending on the foundation’s specific work. This episode features Grameen Foundation.

Guests

Grameen Foundation
Mona McCord
Director, Agriculture Innovations, Grameen Foundation, is a committed international development professional with 15 years experience developing and implementing agriculture and food security programs. At Grameen Foundation, she leads the innovation in agriculture transformation strategy and oversees engagements with a range of public, private and government partners. She is a co-author on USAID’s Feed the Future publication Data-driven Agriculture: The Future of Smallholder Farmer Data Management and Use, which outlines the transformative aspects of digital farmer profile data to support market-led smallholder engagement strategies more efficiently, effectively and sustainably. She has professional experience related to agriculture finance for smallholder farmers in Malawi, Kenya, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Indonesia and Kyrgyzstan. Mona holds a Master’s degree in International Agriculture Development from the University of California, Davis, and served as a small enterprise development volunteer with the U.S. Peace Corps in Mali.

 

Co-Host:
DRosa
Donna Rosa, 2018 - 2019 Feeding Tomorrow Liaison of the IFT International Division, is an international business development services (BDS) consultant specializing in food processing and agribusiness. She works with micro- and small enterprises in developing countries, offering advisory services such as business analysis, business plan development, market research, training, organization development, and counseling. She has a special interest in food security and utilizing food science to address it.

Host:
Teegarden
Matt Teegarden, Ph.D., recently completed his Ph.D. in Food Science at The Ohio State University where he also completed his B.S. and M.S. He now works as a Scientist in Product Research and Development at Abbott Nutrition. Matt’s scientific focus is in food chemistry and functional foods. He is also an active science communicator, as a co-founder of Don’t Eat the Pseudoscience and host of the IFTNext Food Disruptors podcast.

IFTNEXT

Producing self-fertilizing plants to feed more people

As the world’s population grows and changes, more food is needed. A group of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is working to increase food production by making it easier for cereal crops like wheat, corn, and rice to grow without fertilizer.

Rice bran helps reduce malnutrition in infants

Researchers at Colorado State University wondered whether supplementing weaning foods with rice bran would improve the outcomes of malnourished infants.

Increasing rice grain yield

Seeking a way to increase grain yield, researchers at The University of Hong Kong, the University of Calgary, and Rothamsted Research collaborated on a study that lays the foundation for improving rice yields by augmenting the size and weight of grains by 10%.

More News right arrow

U.S. study finds diets remain poor for most children

Despite consuming fewer sugar-sweetened beverages and more whole grains, most American children and adolescents still eat poorly, according to a study published in JAMA.

Too much salt may weaken the immune system

A high-salt diet is not only bad for one’s blood pressure but may also be bad for the immune system. This is the conclusion of a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Tofu may help lower heart disease risk

A study published in the journal Circulation suggests that eating tofu and other plant-based proteins rich in isoflavones may lower the risk of heart disease, particularly in younger and postmenopausal women not taking hormones.

USDA to allow ‘healthy’ claim on certain products

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (USDA FSIS) has published a notice in the Federal Register that it will allow establishments to use the implied nutrient content claim “healthy” on their labels in accordance with certain guidelines.

Consuming fish during pregnancy may benefit children’s metabolic profile

A study published in JAMA Network Open suggests that children whose mothers ate fish one to three times a week during pregnancy were more likely to have a better metabolic profile than children whose mothers ate fish rarely (less than once a week).

Latest News

As coronavirus spreads, fresh produce becomes tougher to get to consumers

According to Reuters, fresh fruit and vegetables will become increasingly scarce in Europe as the coronavirus pandemic hampers the global movement of produce and of the people needed to gather crops.

If You Have the Time, Expand Your Mind...for Free!

If you find yourself with a little extra time while social distancing and self-quarantining and want to refresh your knowledge or learn something new, IFT can help.

USDA signs poultry regionalization agreement with China

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS) has announced a regionalization agreement with China for the safe trade of poultry products.

No Kid Hungry releases $5 million in emergency grants in response to COVID-19

No Kid Hungry, a campaign to end childhood hunger in America, has announced it will be immediately deploying $5 million in emergency grants to ensure children have access to free meals as the pandemic forces school closures.

U.S. government, private sector partner on meals for rural students

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), PepsiCo, food logistics company McLane Global, and the Baylor University Collaborative on Hunger and Poverty are teaming up to provide nearly a million meals a week for students in rural schools closed due to the COVID-19 outbreak.