Creating a food-related product that is scalable, in a market segment that isn’t already saturated can be difficult—no matter your connection to the industry. Even if you get that far, selling into stores and gaining market traction is another hurdle to tackle. During this episode, host Matt Teegarden speaks with Dan Staackmann of Upton’s Naturals and Paul Tasner of PulpWorks will discuss how they got their start, how they scaled their business, and what the roadmap looks like for a successful food start-up.


 

Host:

Matt
Matt Teegarden, M.S., IFT Student Association Past President 2016-2017, Ph.D. Candidate, The Ohio State University

Expert Guest:

Stackman
Dan Staackmann
CEO of Upton’s Naturals, a natural foods company with a focus on meat alternatives and vegan values. Dan pioneered flavored, wheat-based seitan in 2005.

Expert Guest:

Tasner
Paul Tasner
TED speaker, CEO and co-founder of PulpWorks, an environmentally-friendly company that designs and manufactures sustainable packaging for the consumer-packaged goods industry. PulpWorks was founded in response to the worldwide plastic pollution crisis.



Are you a start-up looking for an opportunity to share your innovative product with a large concentration of motivated buyers and venture capitalists?

Then you need to learn more IFT19's IFTNEXT Startup Alley.

IFTNEXT Start-Up Alley, now bigger and better than ever, is where you can meet one-on-one with a leading group of future-forward entrepreneurs developing some of the most innovative products and solutions in the food science industry. Selected Strartups will exhibit and participate in a high-profile pitching event at IFT19 in New Orleans this June.

Applications now being accepted.

Learn more

 

 

In This Article

  1. Startups and New Ventures

More from IFTNEXT right arrow

A new approach to reducing salt while maintaining taste

The dangers of a high-sodium diet have been well documented, but a new technology devised by scientists from Washington State University could help reduce sodium in processed foods while retaining taste and texture.

Sucralose–carbohydrate combo may affect insulin sensitivity

A study found that people who drank beverages that contained the low-calorie sweetener sucralose did experience metabolic problems and issues with neural responses but only when the beverage was formulated with both sucralose and a tasteless sugar (maltodextrin).

More from IFT

Mix-and-Match Protein Products Target Flexitarians

Hybrid products made of animal and plant protein combinations are proliferating.

Protein: Consumer Perspectives and Purchasing Drivers

Plant and Animal Protein Choices: Consumer Viewpoints and Purchasing Behaviors

Collaborating to Create Craveable Menus

An interview with Chef Matt Jost and his work with at Kellogg's new Menuvation Center in The Hatchery. 

Startup Lessons Learned

Experts, investors, and some visionary founders reflect on nine truths about building a successful food and beverage business.

Making a Splash With No- and Low-Alcohol Beverages

As health-conscious consumers seek refreshing, flavorful, and satisfying alternatives to traditional alcoholic beverages, no- and low-alcohol beers, spirits, and mocktails are gaining popularity, spurred by innovations in flavor, function, and variety.

Latest News right arrow

National Honey Board seeks honey–food pairings to encourage consumption of Mediterranean diet

The National Honey Board (NHB) is currently accepting pre-proposals for honey food-pairings to help Americans consume a Mediterranean diet pattern. Interested researchers need to submit a short pre-proposal by November 13, 2020.

COVID-19’s impact on lifestyles and eating behaviors in Asia

According to Innova Market Insights’ COVID-19 Consumer Survey (conducted in March 2020), in China, India, and Indonesia, personal concerns center on health, personal income, and the availability of healthcare and products to buy.

A low-carb diet may lower the risk of blinding eye disease

Following a long-term diet that’s low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein from vegetables may reduce the risk of the most common subtype of glaucoma, according to a study published in Eye-Nature.

FDA announces qualified health claim for cranberry products and urinary tract infections

The U.S. FDA has announced in a letter of enforcement discretion that it does not intend to object to the use of certain qualified health claims regarding consuming certain cranberry products and a reduced risk of recurrent urinary tract infection in healthy women.

Call to action for stronger, better-funded federal nutrition research

According to a group of research, policy, and government experts, the United States needs to strengthen and increase funding for federal nutrition research and improve cross-governmental coordination in order to accelerate discoveries, grow the economy, and—most importantly—improve public health, food/nutrition security, and population resilience.