IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley promotes innovation within the science of food by providing food startups with exceptional exposure to potential customers and VCs.

Each year at IFT’s Annual Event and Food Expo, IFT’s IFTNEXT Startup Alley offers startups the opportunity to showcase their innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders looking to discover the future of food today.

For Startups

Startup Alley offers you a discounted rate to exhibit at one of the largest North American food ingredient and innovation trade shows. The premium location of Startup Alley gives you maximum exposure to the industry professionals who can take your company to the next level.

For Industry Professionals

Discover the next innovation in food. Visit Startup Alley to discover what’s happening on the cutting edge of the science of food and food innovation.

Who Can Participate

Startup Alley is open to startups that have been founded within the past five years. The companies must either be offering a novel solution, innovative product, or they must be disrupting an existing product category using science and innovation.

See complete participating exhibitor criteria.

Kickstart the growth of your startup

Find out how you can showcase your innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders.

Learn more

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Producing self-fertilizing plants to feed more people

As the world’s population grows and changes, more food is needed. A group of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is working to increase food production by making it easier for cereal crops like wheat, corn, and rice to grow without fertilizer.

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