IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley promotes innovation within the science of food by providing food startups with exceptional exposure to potential customers and VCs.

Each year at IFT’s Annual Event and Food Expo, IFT’s IFTNEXT Startup Alley offers startups the opportunity to showcase their innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders looking to discover the future of food today.

For Startups

Startup Alley offers you a discounted rate to exhibit at one of the largest North American food ingredient and innovation trade shows. The premium location of Startup Alley gives you maximum exposure to the industry professionals who can take your company to the next level.

For Industry Professionals

Discover the next innovation in food. Visit Startup Alley to discover what’s happening on the cutting edge of the science of food and food innovation.

Who Can Participate

Startup Alley is open to startups that have been founded within the past five years. The companies must either be offering a novel solution, innovative product, or they must be disrupting an existing product category using science and innovation.

See complete participating exhibitor criteria.

Kickstart the growth of your startup

Find out how you can showcase your innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders.

Learn more

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New appliance refrigerates, stores, and cooks meals

Before the emergence of COVID-19 and stay-at-home orders, one of the biggest complaints of busy individuals was not having time to prepare and cook balanced meals. A new appliance shows promise in solving that problem—for those who can afford it.

Identifying chocolate using its ‘fingerprints’

Researchers from Towson University developed a method for determining where a particular chocolate was produced using its chemical “fingerprint,” with the hopes that it could one day be used to trace the chocolate back to the farm that grew the beans.

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The food business is “brutal,” says Nancy Preston, a U.S. Army veteran who decided in Iraq that she wanted to work in that business. After learning more about the barriers to entry including the incredible financial risk, little access to capital, and a high likelihood of failure, Preston and her husband decided that instead of opening their own café or food truck, they’d focus on helping simplify the process for other food entrepreneurs.

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