IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley

IFTNEXT Startup Alley promotes innovation within the science of food by providing food startups with exceptional exposure to potential customers and VCs.

Each year at IFT’s Annual Event and Food Expo, IFT’s IFTNEXT Startup Alley offers startups the opportunity to showcase their innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders looking to discover the future of food today.

For Startups

Startup Alley offers you a discounted rate to exhibit at one of the largest North American food ingredient and innovation trade shows. The premium location of Startup Alley gives you maximum exposure to the industry professionals who can take your company to the next level.

For Industry Professionals

Discover the next innovation in food. Visit Startup Alley to discover what’s happening on the cutting edge of the science of food and food innovation.

Who Can Participate

Startup Alley is open to startups that have been founded within the past five years. The companies must either be offering a novel solution, innovative product, or they must be disrupting an existing product category using science and innovation.

See complete participating exhibitor criteria.

Kickstart the growth of your startup

Find out how you can showcase your innovations and connect with influential major food company contacts, VCs, and industry leaders.

Learn more

Latest From IFTNEXT right arrow

Space-age mac and cheese

Scientists at Washington State University have developed a process to make macaroni and cheese shelf stable for up to three years.

New vaccine shows promise for saving the world’s supply of pork

Research scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Plum Island Animal Disease Center in New York developed a new vaccine that may help save the world’s pork supply.

Increasing the flavor stability of beer

A group of researchers investigating yeasts with antistaling ability discovered that the flavor stability of beer could be improved by increasing the availability of a molecule called NADH.

Designing a tomato for urban gardens

Picture cherry tomatoes growing in a cluster on a short vine in an urban environment, like the roof of a skyscraper. If the gene-edited tomato plants recently designed by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory prove successful, tomatoes and other crops could one day be the stars of city gardens.

banner

Get the IFTNEXT Newsletter

Published every Tuesday, this free newsletter explores what are, arguably, the next big things in the science of food. Stay in the know.

Subscribe today!