Symrise has announced the addition of extraction capabilities for botanicals and vanilla in its local Teterboro, N.J. facility. The new technology enables the company to offer natural extracts direct to its clients, shortening the lead times and gaining supply chain efficiencies. It also allows for more flexibility in extract formats, since they can be customized to a specific application or customer requirement, especially when creating signature products.

“There is an increased demand for natural ingredients and transparency in the food and beverage marketplace, so Symrise has expanded the footprint of our natural capabilities in North America by manufacturing botanical and vanilla extracts and distillations here in New Jersey,” said Larry Garro, Symrise vice president of operations. “These locally produced raw materials will go into the natural flavors that are part of our Code of Nature naturalness platform.”

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