McCain Foods USA, a U.S. supplier of frozen potato and snack food products, has broken ground on construction of a 170,000-sq-ft expansion at its Othello, Wash., potato processing facility. This $300 million investment will significantly expand McCain Foods North American production capacity through the addition of a battered and conventional french fry processing line. In addition, the expansion will bring an anticipated 180 new jobs to area residents and require approximately 11,000 additional acres, to be sourced from local potato growers in the region.

“Thanks to our passionate farming partners and hardworking employees, McCain Foods has a rich history of producing high quality food right here in Washington,” said Dale McCarthy, vice president of integrated supply chain at McCain Foods North America. “This $300 million expansion will deepen our roots and commitment in this great state and grow the potato industry for years to come.”

Completion of the expansion is anticipated in early 2021.

Press release

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