“We are now seeing CBD-containing products everywhere,” noted the FDA. “CBD can be found in many different products, like drugs, foods, products marketed as dietary supplements, and cosmetics. These products often make questionable health promises about CBD. FDA wants you to know there may be serious risks to using cannabis products, including those containing CBD, if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.”

Although there is no comprehensive research on the effects of CBD on the developing fetus, pregnant mother, or breastfed baby, the FDA states that it “is continuing to collect and study the data on the possible harmful effects of CBD during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. However, based on what we do know, there is significant cause for concern.”

Among the potential dangers noted by the FDA are that high doses of CBD in pregnant test animals “have caused problems with the reproductive system of developing male fetuses. In addition, based on what we already know about CBD, we expect that some amount of CBD will be transferred to babies through breast milk.”

The FDA also warns of the potential for CBD products to be contaminated with substances that may pose a risk to the fetus or breastfed baby, including THC. “We have also heard reports of CBD potentially containing other contaminants (e.g., pesticides, heavy metals, bacteria, and fungus); we are investigating this.”

The agency stated that it will be studying the effects of CBD use from different angles, including “(1) the use of CBD-containing products, like food, cosmetics, or supplements, over a person’s entire life; and (2) the effects of using these various products in combination. There are many unanswered questions about the science, safety, and quality of products containing CBD.”

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