Kemin Industries, a global ingredient manufacturer, has announced the opening of a new 2,300-sq-ft Bakery Innovation Center at its global headquarters in Des Moines. The $1.5-million investment was designed to inspire innovation within the bakery market, and includes all the equipment, capabilities, and bakery support team needed for Kemin and its customer-partners to accelerate product development.

The bakery expansion also includes the launch of batch packs, premixes, emulsifiers, and enzyme blends specific to flatbreads and baked goods. These products complement Kemin Food Technologies’ existing portfolio of plant extracts, antioxidants, and mold-inhibiting products to help manufacturers maintain safety and freshness. The dedicated Bakery Innovation Center combines R&D support and expertise, customer laboratory services, and an in-house bakery pilot plant, allowing bakery and snack manufacturers to expedite commercialization of new bakery products.

“Our new facility is a game-changer for our bakery business, as it gives us the opportunity to work more closely with our customer-partners,” said Anita Srivastava, senior product development manager, bakery applications, Kemin Food Technologies. “We provide support to customers by helping them understand the process and science behind our ingredient solutions. The Bakery Innovation Center gives us a way to screen and test all new ingredient solutions and processing parameters to ensure success, which is really exciting.”

Press release

More News right arrow

Light drinking may protect brain function

Light to moderate drinking may preserve brain function in older age, according to a new study published in JAMA Network Open.

Diets higher in acidic foods may increase mortality risk for cancer survivors

A study published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine suggests that foods that produce sulfuric, phosphoric, or organic acids, may increase the mortality risk of cancer survivors with a past history of smoking.

Common food additive may cause adverse health effects in mice

A common food additive, recently banned in France but allowed in the United States and many other countries, was found to significantly alter gut microbiota in mice, causing inflammation in the colon and changes in protein expression in the liver, according to research published in Small.

Sugary drink tax models show health gains, cost reductions

A simulation model of different designs of taxes on sugary drinks and their effects on obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes suggests that all tax designs would generate substantial health gains as well as lower health costs in the United States.

A variety of healthy eating patterns may be associated with lower heart disease risk

Greater adherence to a variety of healthy eating patterns was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Upcoming Events Listing right arrow

NYIFT Suppliers Day and Career Fair

Secaucus, New Jersey, United States

IFT Weekly Newsletter

Rich in industry news and highlights, the Weekly Newsletter delivers the goods in to your inbox every Wednesday.

Subscribe for free