In a public letter, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson announced a multi-decade commitment to be a “resource-positive company.” The coffee giant’s goal is to store more carbon than it emits, eliminate waste, and provide more clean, freshwater than it uses. The announcement included science-based preliminary targets for the reduction of carbon emissions, water use, and waste by 2030, and outlined five strategies the company has identified to move toward them.

The preliminary targets to meet by 2030 are as follows:

  1. A 50% reduction in carbon emissions in Starbucks direct operations and supply chain.
  2. 50% of water withdrawal for direct operations and coffee production will be conserved or replenished with a focus on communities and basins with high water risk.
  3. A 50% reduction in waste sent to landfill from stores and manufacturing, driven by a broader shift toward a circular economy.

A year from now, the company plans to formalize its 2030 environmental goals based on learnings between now and then. This year will involve market research and trials to better understand consumer behavior and incentives to encourage more use of reusable containers.

Starbucks also announced the following five strategies to become a resource-positive company:

  1. Expanding plant-based options, migrating toward a more environmentally friendly menu.
  2. Shifting from single-use to reusable packaging.
  3. Investing in innovative and regenerative agricultural practices, reforestation, forest conservation, and water replenishment in the Starbucks supply chain.
  4. Investing in better ways to manage waste, both in Starbucks stores and in its communities, to ensure more reuse, recycling, and elimination of food waste.
  5. Innovating to develop more eco-friendly stores, operations, manufacturing, and delivery.

Press release

In This Article

  1. Sustainability
  2. Beverages

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