Most people think of bacteria as something that makes you sick. While bacteria can certainly be responsible for various illnesses and everyday annoyances, not all bacteria are bad for you.

In fact, without the bacteria that live in everyone's digestive system, our bodies wouldn't be able to properly process food. People are increasingly turning to probiotics as a way to create a healthier balance of gut bacteria. Probiotics are living microorganisms that when consumed in sufficient quantities can exert beneficial health benefits. Often referred to as friendly bacteria or good bacteria, probiotics increase the abundance of beneficial microbiota and/or decrease the abundance of detrimental microbiota in the gut.

Probiotics are available in a growing number of foods, beverages, and dietary supplements. Fermented foods, such as cultured milk, yogurt, kefir, sauerkraut, tempeh, kimchi, miso, and kombucha, are known sources of probiotics.

If you are interested in learning more after watching our video, check out The Role of Probiotics in Metabolic Health

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