IFT Food Facts

For most of us, balancing the desire to reduce sugar intake with our love of sweet foods and drinks is a constant battle. Fortunately for those who can’t resist a sweet treat, high-intensity sweeteners are an available alternative. 

After watching the video, check out The Lowdown on Sugar Substitutes for more detailed information on the various alternative sweeteners available.

Note: High-intensity sweeteners are considered to be safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) when consumed at levels within the Acceptable Daily Intake. Consumers with phenylketonuria, a rare genetic disorder, have difficulty metabolizing phenylalanine, a component of aspartame, and should avoid or restrict aspartame consumption. Food products that contain aspartame are required to include a statement on the label that the product contains phenylalanine.

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