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There are a myriad of ingredients that battle bad bacteria that grow on meat products, prevent mold growth on bread, or reduce the risk of off-flavors developing in cheese, but while these ingredients are deemed safe and effective by regulatory agencies, some do not meet the so-called 
"clean label" demands that a segment of consumers have placed on food manufacturers.

The clean label movement seeks out foods with easy-to-recognize ingredients and no artificial ingredients or synthetic chemicals. With this clean and clear label movement comes an increased demand for ingredients that are domestically sourced, organic, or not genetically modified. Ingredient manufacturers are expanding their repertoire of food safety and preservation solutions to move beyond synthetic ingredients and explore clean label options—everything from herbs and spices to specially designed cultures. 

Avocado

Researchers have found that fatty acid derivatives from avocado seeds have the potential to fight listeria monocytogenes.

Rosemary

When combined with citrus, rosemary can inhibit the growth of salmonella and listeria without affecting the final product.

Vinegar

Buffered vinegar is a healthy, clean label alternative to synthetic antimicrobials such as sodium lactate/diacetate.

Pea Pod

Food scientists are using pea proteins utilized to create lecithin free, non-GMO, and gluten-free powdered drink mixes.

Garlic

Researchers have found that garlic extract can inhibit the growth of shigella ssp. in hummus.

 

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