The World Food Prize Foundation has named Barbara Stinson as president of the organization, effective Jan. 4, 2020. Stinson previously served as a co-founder and senior partner of the Meridian Institute, a non-profit organization that guides collaboration and drives action to address our world’s most complex challenges. She will succeed Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn, whose 20-year presidency established the international reputation and secured the legacy of the World Food Prize. Stinson will become the second president of the Foundation since Norman Borlaug established it in 1986.

Stinson brings more than 30 years of experience in environmental public policy and business management, focusing the past 10 years on global food security and food safety. She has successfully led collaborations addressing complex challenges, such as tackling food safety in sub-Saharan Africa and addressing the impact of climate change in agricultural productivity. Her work emphasizes policies and programs that support smallholder farmers, especially women and youth, by bringing institutional support and access to new tools, technologies, and data to improve the quantity, quality, and availability of food.

“I am excited and honored to lead the World Food Prize Foundation. I am committed to shaping the strategic direction of the Foundation, expanding the reach of its collaborations and programs to continue Dr. Borlaug’s mission to end hunger,” said Stinson. “I look forward to working alongside the council of advisors, laureates, partners, and talented team to make a meaningful impact in the lives of smallholder farmers, specifically women and youth. It’s imperative that public and private partners collectively mobilize to address critical global challenges that are impacting the health of our people and planet. Together, I am confident we can make significant progress by 2050.”

Prior to her work at Meridian, Stinson worked in the science and public policy program for The Keystone Policy Center. She earned a master’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a BA in environmental conservation from the University of Colorado, Boulder.

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