Meat eaters are increasingly selecting plant-based protein options rather than meat for health, environmental, and flavor reasons. Nevertheless, meat consumption worldwide is expected to increase 1.4% per year through 2023, according to data published in the new Packaged Facts report Global Meat & Poultry Trends.

Meat and poultry consumption in the United States is expected to increase less than 1% per year through 2023, but more significant gains are projected in other parts of the world. Most notably, nations in Africa and the Middle East are forecast to register the fastest increases in meat consumption, as rising living standards and income levels allow more people to incorporate meat into their regular diet.

“In many parts of the world, meat is among the least affordable food options. It is generally pricier than locally available grains, beans, vegetables, and fruit. However, as average incomes rise, more people eat meat, first as an occasional treat and then finally as something they consume multiple times a week, if not daily,” said David Sprinkle, research director for Packaged Facts, in a press release.

Globally, pork and poultry dominate meat consumption. The average prices for these meats are significantly lower than for beef, which contributes to their high levels of consumption, even in low-income countries. In the United States specifically, poultry remains the most consumed type of meat due to its low cost. Meanwhile, beef consumption is expected to stagnate, as U.S. consumers are increasingly selecting other protein sources due to the adverse health effects associated with high levels of red meat consumption. Nevertheless, the United States is a global leader in beef production, and Packaged Facts anticipates the segment will continue to account for a large share of total consumption.

Press release

More News right arrow

Commercially available cell line rapidly detects African Swine Fever Virus

Scientists from the USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have identified a new way to detect the presence of live African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) that minimizes the need for samples from live animals and provides easier access to veterinary labs that need to diagnose the virus.

USDA provides an update on 2019 Tyson beef plant closure and COVID-19 investigation

The report, prepared by USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service in coordination with the Office of the Chief Economist, summarizes market conditions, fed cattle prices, boxed beef values, and the spread before and after the fire and plant closure at the Tyson Holcomb, Kan., plant, and before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

EFSA seeks public comment on nutrient assessment framework

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has released a draft approach that aims to harmonize assessments of the intake of these nutrients, the potentially hazardous properties of excessive intakes, and the overall risks for consumers.

FSMA inspections of small businesses to begin March 2021

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced that routine inspections of small businesses to verify compliance with the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act’s (FSMA) Intentional Adulteration (IA) rule will begin in March 2021.

FDA debuts New Era of Smarter Food Safety blueprint

On July 13, Stephen M. Hahn, commissioner for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), announced the release of the New Era of Smarter Food Safety blueprint.

IFT Weekly Newsletter

Rich in industry news and highlights, the Weekly Newsletter delivers the goods in to your inbox every Wednesday.

Subscribe for free