Melanie Zanoza Bartelme

Burt’s Bees Plant-Based Protein Shake

Burt’s Bees Plant-Based Protein Shake mixes provide 15 grams of protein per serving from five sources: pea, rice, flaxseed, sunflower seed, and oat.

The Little Kernel’s mini popcorn

The Little Kernel uses small-kernel corn that’s roughly half the size of a normal popcorn kernel, which makes it less likely to get stuck in teeth and amplifies the snack’s flavor profile.

Cinn-Credible cinnamon

A single-serve cinnamon packet inspired by soldiers’ desire to add a touch of home to foods they eat while deployed, according to Cinn-Credible cocreator and Air Force veteran Will Atkins.

From personal care to protein
Burt’s Bees
, a brand known for its natural lip and skincare products, recently ventured into the functional food arena with its Burt’s Bees Plant-Based Protein Shake mixes, which provide 15 grams of protein per serving from five sources: pea, rice, flaxseed, sunflower seed, and oat.

“Entering the functional foods space is a natural extension for us,” says Jim Geikie, general manager for Burt’s Bees. “For three decades, Burt’s Bees has connected people to the beauty, wisdom, and power of nature. And for just as long, we’ve held the belief that real beauty and well-being should be nourished from the inside out.”

The line, which includes Daily Protein, Protein + Gut Health with Probiotics, and Protein + Healthy Radiance with Antioxidant Vitamins A, C & E, features vitamins extracted from real fruits and veggies, such as spinach, shiitake mushrooms, and strawberries. The line is free from genetically modified ingredients, gluten, soy, dairy, and artificial sweeteners or flavors; the shake mixes are sweetened with honey, monk fruit extract, and stevia. Available in vanilla or chocolate, Burt’s Bees Protein Shakes are available on Burtsbees.com, Amazon.com, and at select retailers for a suggested retail price of $29.99–$39.99 per each 16- to 18-serving container.


Tiny kernel, big flavor
Noticing the popularity of popcorn products in the market, The Little Kernel’s founders decided to launch their own ready-to-eat popcorn using small-kernel corn that’s roughly half the size of a normal popcorn kernel. “We loved that this heirloom variety of corn was essentially hull-less, which makes it less likely to get stuck in your teeth,” explains cofounder Chris Laurita.

He says that the smaller density of the corn also enabled The Little Kernel to amplify the flavor profile of each product; varieties include Truffle Sea Salt, Sweet & Salty, White Cheddar, Butter, Naked, and Pink Himalayan Salt, which Laurita says the founders selected because of the benefits it is thought to provide in comparison with regular salt.

The kid-friendly snacks are gluten-free, non-GM, dairy-free, and use certified whole grains, and the kernels are popped in 100% olive oil. They can be found at retailers that include Sprouts, ShopRite, and Giant for a suggested retail price of $3.49.


Cinnamon packets inspired by soldiers
A new single-serve cinnamon packet was inspired by soldiers’ desire to add a touch of home to the foods they ate while stationed in Afghanistan, according to Cinn-Credible cocreator and Air Force veteran Will Atkins. While overseas, he and his fellow soldiers found it impossible to obtain the cinnamon they wanted to add to their coffee and oatmeal.

“Many soldiers need some ‘me’ time to decompress and take time to themselves, and many do it with a cup of coffee or tea in a quiet part of the base. If they used cinnamon in their coffee/tea before deploying, they’ve been without it for a great length of time,” explains Atkins.

Atkins and his wife, Katrina, found a cinnamon source and a manufacturer outside of Chicago—Assemblies Unlimited—that have helped ready the company for large-scale production, using crowdfunding sites and freelance platforms to create their graphic design. Communicating via email thanks to the time difference in Afghanistan, Assemblies Unlimited guided Atkins through the production process, filling the packets in a way similar to that of making powdered creamer.

Atkins currently sells the packets on his website, cinnamonpackets.com, as well as in coffee shops from Arizona to Maryland; he’s planning to expand distribution in the Washington, D.C., area and into major coffee chains. He also has been sending them to soldiers overseas.