Proper nutrition is essential at every stage of life. The Nutrition Facts label on packaged foods and beverages is a valuable tool to help people make more informed decisions about the nutritional content of the foods they plan to purchase and eat. 

The Nutrition Facts label clearly identifies:

  • Servings Per Container
  • Serving Size
  • Number of Calories Per Serving
  • The percentage of the Daily Value for each nutrient in a serving of the food
  • Nutrient content

All of this information is useful in choosing healthier foods and reducing the risk of diet-related chronic disease.

Most people exceed the recommended limits for saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars, so the Nutrition Facts label can help you reduce consumption.

There are other nutrients, such as dietary fiber, vitamin D, calcium, iron and potassium, that many people do not consume enough of. Checking the label can help you identify foods high in these nutrients to eat more of.

So next time you’re trying to decide what to eat, check the Nutrition Facts label and take a step toward a long-term healthy lifestyle.

 

--->

More from IFT right arrow

The Science Behind the Pucker

Formulators of plant-based foods want their products to taste less astringent. So an engineer, a food scientist, and an oral biologist are teaming up to solve the problem.

From Bean to Bar—Chocolate Without Bitterness

Researchers study the effect of roasting cacao beans on the bitterness of chocolate made from the beans.

Personal, Planetary Health Drive Snack Formulating

An update on the trends in healthy snacks and the ingredients used in formulating them

What’s Good for the Gut

Linda Milo Ohr explores the ways that prebiotics, probiotics, and postbiotics support gut health and overall health.

From Field to Film

A profile of South Dakota State researcher Srinivas Janaswamy and his work on creating sustainable packaging films.

IFTNEXT

Episode 29: All About Food Safety Culture

In this podcast, we discuss food safety culture, including how food safety culture is established, measured, and how they are expected to change in light of ongoing advancements in food science and policy. Our guests include Hugo Gutierrez, Global Food Safety and Quality Officer for Kerry, and Bob Gravani, Professor Emeritus of Food Science and Director Emeritus of the National Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) Program at Cornell University.

New rapid tests for botulinum toxin

In the food industry, botulinum toxin is associated with a severe form of food poisoning caused by improperly preserved food. Researchers have developed a technology that addresses the role of botulinum toxin in both food and cosmetic applications.